Top Historic Sights in Île d'Yeu, France

Explore the historic highlights of Île d'Yeu

St. Saviour’s Church

The church of Saint Saviour (L'église de Saint-Sauveur) was originally built around 1040 by monks. The present Neo-Gothic style date from the reconstruction made in 1857 to the grounds of medieval church.
Founded: ca. 1040 | Location: Île d'Yeu, France

Pointe des Corbeaux Lighthouse

The Pointe des Corbeaux lighthouse was constructed in 1950 to replace an earlier tower destroyed during World War II. Along with the Île d'Yeu lighthouse, it is one of two lighthouses on the island to have been designed by Maurice Durand; construction of both was completed in the same year. The first lighthouse on the point was lit on September 1, 1862. A small tourelle encased in masonry, it stood 38 feet tall, an ...
Founded: 1950 | Location: Île d'Yeu, France

Vieux Chateau de Isle d'Yeu

The Vieux-château de l'île d'Yeu ("Old castle of the Isle of Yeu") is a fortification on the island of île d'Yeu. Olivier IV de Clisson, a great builder of castles, undertook the work with the aim of protecting the islanders in the event of foreign invasion. The longest of these had been led by the famous English pirate, Robert Knolles, who managed to seize the castle in 1355 and occupied the island ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Île d'Yeu, France

Fort de Pierre-Levée

Fort de Pierre-Levée, also known as La Citadelle is a fortress built between 1858-1866. It was purposed for 400 soldiers. Since 1871 the fortress functioned as a barracks and prison. The most famous prisoner was Philippe Pétain (1856-1951), a French general who reached the distinction of Marshal of France, and was later Chief of State of Vichy France during World War II. He died in Fort de Pierre-Levé ...
Founded: 1858-1866 | Location: Île d'Yeu, France

Dolmen des petits Fradets

The dolmen was erected around 300 BC.
Founded: 300 BC | Location: Île d'Yeu, France

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Beckov Castle

The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.