Top Historic Sights in Île d'Yeu, France

Explore the historic highlights of Île d'Yeu

St. Saviour’s Church

The church of Saint Saviour (L'église de Saint-Sauveur) was originally built around 1040 by monks. The present Neo-Gothic style date from the reconstruction made in 1857 to the grounds of medieval church.
Founded: ca. 1040 | Location: Île d'Yeu, France

Pointe des Corbeaux Lighthouse

The Pointe des Corbeaux lighthouse was constructed in 1950 to replace an earlier tower destroyed during World War II. Along with the Île d'Yeu lighthouse, it is one of two lighthouses on the island to have been designed by Maurice Durand; construction of both was completed in the same year. The first lighthouse on the point was lit on September 1, 1862. A small tourelle encased in masonry, it stood 38 feet tall, an ...
Founded: 1950 | Location: Île d'Yeu, France

Vieux Chateau de Isle d'Yeu

The Vieux-château de l'île d'Yeu ("Old castle of the Isle of Yeu") is a fortification on the island of île d'Yeu. Olivier IV de Clisson, a great builder of castles, undertook the work with the aim of protecting the islanders in the event of foreign invasion. The longest of these had been led by the famous English pirate, Robert Knolles, who managed to seize the castle in 1355 and occupied the island ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Île d'Yeu, France

Fort de Pierre-Levée

Fort de Pierre-Levée, also known as La Citadelle is a fortress built between 1858-1866. It was purposed for 400 soldiers. Since 1871 the fortress functioned as a barracks and prison. The most famous prisoner was Philippe Pétain (1856-1951), a French general who reached the distinction of Marshal of France, and was later Chief of State of Vichy France during World War II. He died in Fort de Pierre-Levé ...
Founded: 1858-1866 | Location: Île d'Yeu, France

Dolmen des petits Fradets

The dolmen was erected around 300 BC.
Founded: 300 BC | Location: Île d'Yeu, France

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Dunluce Castle

Dunluce Castle is a ruined medieval castle located on the edge of a basalt outcropping in County Antrim, and is accessible via a bridge connecting it to the mainland. The castle is surrounded by extremely steep drops on either side, which may have been an important factor to the early Christians and Vikings who were drawn to this place where an early Irish fort once stood.

In the 13th century, Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster, built the first castle at Dunluce. The earliest features of the castle are two large drum towers about 9 metres in diameter on the eastern side, both relics of a stronghold built here by the McQuillans after they became lords of the Route.

The McQuillans were the Lords of Route from the late 13th century until they were displaced by the MacDonnell after losing two major battles against them during the mid- and late-16th century.

Later Dunluce Castle became the home of the chief of the Clan MacDonnell of Antrim and the Clan MacDonald of Dunnyveg from Scotland.

In 1588 the Girona, a galleass from the Spanish Armada, was wrecked in a storm on the rocks nearby. The cannons from the ship were installed in the gatehouses and the rest of the cargo sold, the funds being used to restore the castle.

Dunluce Castle served as the seat of the Earl of Antrim until the impoverishment of the MacDonnells in 1690, following the Battle of the Boyne. Since that time, the castle has deteriorated and parts were scavenged to serve as materials for nearby buildings.