Top Historic Sights in Dieppe, France

Explore the historic highlights of Dieppe

Château de Dieppe

Château de Dieppe was founded in 1188 and destroyed in 1195. The site was restored in the 14th century. The castle was largely reconstructed by Charles des Marets in 1433. The castle is composed of a quadrangular enclosure with round flanking towers and a lower court adjacent. The large west tower dates perhaps from the 14th century, and served as the keep. Several architectural styles are represented, and flint and sand ...
Founded: 1188 | Location: Dieppe, France

St. Jacques Church

Built between the 12th and 16th centuries, the Saint-Jacques church bears evidence to various epochs. A first church was constructed on the remains of the small chapel of Sainte-Catherine, which itself was destroyed in 1195. The church that we see today, dedicated to Saint-Jacques was built around 1283. The church on the sea route of pilgrimage to Saint-Jacques of Compostella, was of vast proportions. The building was how ...
Founded: 1283 | Location: Dieppe, France

St. Rémy Church

The first Saint-Rémy church, of which only the tower remains today, was built in the 13th century. It was built at the foot of the hill on which stands the castle. The church gradually fell to ruins and the new Saint Rémy church was built in the heart of the town. It was Thomas Bouchard, deputy mayor and treasurer of the parish who laid the first stone in 1522. The gothic centre, surrounded by an ambulatory and radiatin ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Dieppe, France

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.