St. Jacques Church

Dieppe, France

Built between the 12th and 16th centuries, the Saint-Jacques church bears evidence to various epochs. A first church was constructed on the remains of the small chapel of Sainte-Catherine, which itself was destroyed in 1195. The church that we see today, dedicated to Saint-Jacques was built around 1283. The church on the sea route of pilgrimage to Saint-Jacques of Compostella, was of vast proportions. The building was however not finished until the end of the 16th century. The architectural evolution of the church allows us to follow the traces of Gothic art over 4 centuries.

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Details

Founded: 1283
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sandrine G (11 months ago)
Très belle édifice situé au cœur de dieppe église très très hot magnifique à l'intérieur toujours ouverte on peut visiter bien placé possibilité de se stationner pas loin on est au cœur de la ville et des commerces
Alain GOUBERT (12 months ago)
Très belle église pourvu qu'elle soit restaurée rapidement !
tessa figeland (12 months ago)
Kerken in het buitenland is altijd bijzonder om er even te kijken. Maar geloof heb ik niet maar wel leuk en mooi om te zien
Alain Huinen (14 months ago)
Mooie kerk, zeer kleinschalig stadje. Verder weinig te zien.
Dirk Rösler (16 months ago)
Beautiful church with an air of mystery
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