Château de Dieppe

Dieppe, France

Château de Dieppe was founded in 1188 and destroyed in 1195. The site was restored in the 14th century. The castle was largely reconstructed by Charles des Marets in 1433. The castle is composed of a quadrangular enclosure with round flanking towers and a lower court adjacent. The large west tower dates perhaps from the 14th century, and served as the keep. Several architectural styles are represented, and flint and sandstone are used in the buildings. A brick bastion and various other buildings have been added to the original enclosure. The town walls were built around 1360. The walls were extended between 1435 and 1442. Although the town was largely destroyed by an Anglo-Dutch naval bombardment in 1694, the castle survived.

Until 1923, the castle housed the Ruffin barracks. It was bought by the town in 1903 and today is home to the Dieppe museum with its collection of ivories (crucifixes, rosaries, statuettes, fans, snuffboxes, etc.), maritime exhibits and the papers and belongings of Camille Saint-Saëns. The castle offers a panoramic view over the town and the coast.

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Address

Rue de Chastes, Dieppe, France
See all sites in Dieppe

Details

Founded: 1188
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jamie Prince (4 years ago)
Interesting place to go for a walk and explore, I didnt look in the museum but the grounds are very nice, dogs are allowed. Toilets came in handy as im stuck in dieppe living in a very small car for 3 days before I can travel back to the UK :)
Tim Corbett (4 years ago)
Great views and some interesting exhibits. Nothing on the Raid or the Battle at Arques which is a shame but great views across the town
Paula Potter (4 years ago)
A definite visit for Canadians, there is so much Canadian history in Dieppe. Such a beautiful seaside town too. Love it.
Liv Candless (4 years ago)
Very rude lady receptionist who was very suspicious that I was not a student despite showing my student card. Spoke in French to her colleague beside her while preparing our tickets, ignoring us completely. There was very little English explanation in the museum, not tourist friendly at all. Not worth the entry fee (students enter free) although the views of the seafront are worth climbing up the hill for. Don't risk ruining your mood for this museum which has a very subpar collection of art.
Mira Demeter (4 years ago)
The Chateau is a lovely place, it’s very old & historic. The view from there is fantastic! The tickets are around 5 euros small children don’t pay. There’s the bottom part of the castle available, you cannot access towers. It’s like a museum & gallery in one. There’s an Ivory museum too. But gutted as there wasn’t an English guide to read so didn’t actually learn anything about the history of this place. It’s open currently 10-12 & 2-5 and shut otherwise. There’s free toilets on the premises, it has entrances from the bottom & top of the castle. I wish the people working there were a bit more pleasant but as a sightseeing & historical place it’s lovely. Family friendly. Recommended to visit if in Dieppe.
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Lorca Castle

Castle of Lorca (Castillo de Lorca) is a fortress of medieval origin constructed between the 9th and 15th centuries. It consists of a series of defensive structures that, during the Middle Ages, made the town and the fortress an impregnable point in the southeast part of the Iberian Peninsula. Lorca Castle was a key strategic point of contention between Christians and Muslims during the Reconquista.

Archaeological excavations have revealed that the site of the castle has been inhabited since Neolithic times.

Muslim Era

It has not been determined exactly when a castle or fortress was first built on the hill. The first written documentation referring to a castle at Lorca is of Muslim origin, which in the 9th century, indicates that the city of Lurqa was an important town in the area ruled by Theudimer (Tudmir). During Muslim rule, Lorca Castle was an impregnable fortress and its interior was divided into two sections by the Espaldón Wall. In the western part, there was an area used to protect livestock and grain in times of danger. The eastern part had a neighbourhood called the barrio de Alcalá.

After Reconquista

Lorca was conquered by the Castilian Infante Don Alfonso, the future Alfonso X, in 1244, and the fortress became a key defensive point against the Kingdom of Granada. For 250 years, Lorca Castle was a watchpoint on the border between the Christian kingdom of Murcia and the Muslim state of Granada.

Alfonso X ordered the construction of the towers known as the Alfonsina and Espolón Towers, and strengthened and fixed the walls. Hardly a trace of the Muslim fortress remained due to this reconstruction. Muslim traces remain in the foundation stones and the wall known as the muro del Espaldón.

The Jewish Quarter was found within the alcazaba, the Moorish fortification, separated from the rest of the city by its walls. The physical separation had the purpose of protecting the Jewish people in the town from harm, but also had the result of keeping Christians and Jews separate, with the Christians inhabiting the lower part of town.

The remains of the Jewish Quarter extended over an area of 5,700 square m, and 12 homes and a synagogue have been found; the synagogue dates from the 14th century and is the only one found in the Murcia. The streets of the town had an irregular layout, adapted to the landscape, and is divided into four terraces. The synagogue was in the central location, and around it were the homes. The homes were of rectangular shape, with various compartmentalized rooms. The living quarters were elevated and a common feature was benches attached to the walls, kitchens, stand for earthenware jars, or cupboards.

Modern history

With the disappearance of the frontier after the conquest of Granada in 1492, Lorca Castle no longer became as important as before. With the expulsion of the Jews by order of Ferdinand and Isabella, Lorca Castle was also depopulated as a result. The castle was abandoned completely, and was almost a complete ruin by the 18th century. In the 19th century, the castle was refurbished due to the War of Spanish Independence. The walls and structures were repaired or modified and its medieval look changed. A battery of cannons was installed, for example, during this time. In 1931 Lorca Castle was declared a National Historic Monument.

Currently, a parador (luxury hotel) has been built within the castle. As a result, archaeological discoveries have been found, including the Jewish Quarter.