Château de Dieppe

Dieppe, France

Château de Dieppe was founded in 1188 and destroyed in 1195. The site was restored in the 14th century. The castle was largely reconstructed by Charles des Marets in 1433. The castle is composed of a quadrangular enclosure with round flanking towers and a lower court adjacent. The large west tower dates perhaps from the 14th century, and served as the keep. Several architectural styles are represented, and flint and sandstone are used in the buildings. A brick bastion and various other buildings have been added to the original enclosure. The town walls were built around 1360. The walls were extended between 1435 and 1442. Although the town was largely destroyed by an Anglo-Dutch naval bombardment in 1694, the castle survived.

Until 1923, the castle housed the Ruffin barracks. It was bought by the town in 1903 and today is home to the Dieppe museum with its collection of ivories (crucifixes, rosaries, statuettes, fans, snuffboxes, etc.), maritime exhibits and the papers and belongings of Camille Saint-Saëns. The castle offers a panoramic view over the town and the coast.

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Address

Rue de Chastes, Dieppe, France
See all sites in Dieppe

Details

Founded: 1188
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jamie Prince (9 months ago)
Interesting place to go for a walk and explore, I didnt look in the museum but the grounds are very nice, dogs are allowed. Toilets came in handy as im stuck in dieppe living in a very small car for 3 days before I can travel back to the UK :)
Tim Corbett (10 months ago)
Great views and some interesting exhibits. Nothing on the Raid or the Battle at Arques which is a shame but great views across the town
Paula Potter (11 months ago)
A definite visit for Canadians, there is so much Canadian history in Dieppe. Such a beautiful seaside town too. Love it.
Liv Candless (12 months ago)
Very rude lady receptionist who was very suspicious that I was not a student despite showing my student card. Spoke in French to her colleague beside her while preparing our tickets, ignoring us completely. There was very little English explanation in the museum, not tourist friendly at all. Not worth the entry fee (students enter free) although the views of the seafront are worth climbing up the hill for. Don't risk ruining your mood for this museum which has a very subpar collection of art.
Mira Demeter (13 months ago)
The Chateau is a lovely place, it’s very old & historic. The view from there is fantastic! The tickets are around 5 euros small children don’t pay. There’s the bottom part of the castle available, you cannot access towers. It’s like a museum & gallery in one. There’s an Ivory museum too. But gutted as there wasn’t an English guide to read so didn’t actually learn anything about the history of this place. It’s open currently 10-12 & 2-5 and shut otherwise. There’s free toilets on the premises, it has entrances from the bottom & top of the castle. I wish the people working there were a bit more pleasant but as a sightseeing & historical place it’s lovely. Family friendly. Recommended to visit if in Dieppe.
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