Top Historic Sights in Boppard, Germany

Explore the historic highlights of Boppard

Boppard Roman Fort

Boppard’s most famous sight is a castrum, a Roman Fort. The military camp of Bodobrica was established here in 360 AD. It is thought to be the best preserved example north of the Alps today. It once had 28 towers, and was a commercial centre as well as a fort. It was 308 × 154 metres and formed a rectangle of 4,7 hectare. The walls were 3 metres thick to the land side and 2,5 metres thick to the Rhine side. W ...
Founded: 360 AD | Location: Boppard, Germany

St. Severus Church

The romanesque church of St. Severus with its two towers was built in the 12th-13th centuries over the Roman baths. The church has a rich architectural construction and very decorative frescoes. Unique details are the Triumph Cross (13th century), early Christian gravestones and baptismal font (6th century).
Founded: 12th century | Location: Boppard, Germany

Electoral Castle

The Electoral Castle, with its solid construction and bulky tower, forms the townscape and portrays the power of its builder, the Archbishop and Elector of Trier. The castle had many purposes. It was a fortification to keep enemies out, a stronghold to keep the Boppard nobles at bay and a toll castle for collecting toll from the ships passing Boppard and filling the Elector’s pockets. Like most castles along the Rh ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Boppard, Germany

Carmelite Church

The Carmelite Church is Gothic and was built in the 14th century. It has a wealth of treasures, including gravestones and the choir stalls (15th century). That the Carmelite monks honoured Our Lady can be seen in the many illustrations of Mary e.g. the Grape Madonna (outside the church), the Madonna in the Rosary and the Pieta. The former Carmelite monastery is now the Town Hall.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Boppard, Germany

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Monet's Garden

Claude Monet lived for forty-three years, from 1883 to 1926, in Giverny. With a passion for gardening as well as for colours, he conceived both his flower garden and water garden as true works of art. Walking through his house and gardens, visitors can still feel the atmosphere which reigned at the home of the Master of Impressionnism and marvel at the floral compositions and nymphéas, his greatest sources of inspiration.

In 1890 Monet had enough money to buy the house and land outright and set out to create the magnificent gardens he wanted to paint. Some of his most famous paintings were of his garden in Giverny, famous for its rectangular Clos normand, with archways of climbing plants entwined around colored shrubs, and the water garden, formed by a tributary to the Epte, with the Japanese bridge, the pond with the water lilies, the wisterias and the azaleas.

Today the Monet's Garden is open to the public.