Boppard Roman Fort

Boppard, Germany

Boppard’s most famous sight is a castrum, a Roman Fort. The military camp of Bodobrica was established here in 360 AD. It is thought to be the best preserved example north of the Alps today. It once had 28 towers, and was a commercial centre as well as a fort. It was 308 × 154 metres and formed a rectangle of 4,7 hectare. The walls were 3 metres thick to the land side and 2,5 metres thick to the Rhine side. With a height of 9 metres and 20 horse-shoe shaped towers to the land side, each 27 metres apart, the wall made a very powerful fortification.

The fort can be wandered around freely and it is in remarkably preserved condition. Many of the finds that have been recovered and excavated from the site can be found in the Boppard museum.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Kirchgasse 5, Boppard, Germany
See all sites in Boppard

Details

Founded: 360 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

karen stander (4 years ago)
Bought some Eiswein.... This is a picture perfect place. Just love Boppard!!!
Michael Helbach (4 years ago)
Xx
Tommy Volckaerts (5 years ago)
Remains of an old Roman fortification, open 24/7 and free of charge, so an absolute must see. Remember, this used to be the Roman border.
Frank Mélotte (5 years ago)
A must see when you are interested in Roman history. Consider an opidium at the Rhine that had such a huge Roman castle! This place was huge and the remains will still thrill those who have some imagination. The graves outside the castle, the vastness of the stone built towers and the length till the other side of the castle (at the Rhine). A must see, even though you may not spend half an hour at the spot.
Stephen Digby (6 years ago)
Baudobriga fort built in 300's by order of Emperor Julian to keep out Germans. Best preserved Roman fortress walls in Germany. Original outer stones have been taken but kernel of concrete and stone mix remains. Original fort extended at least to St Severus. Frankish graves from 600's shown in site with transparent weather covers. Site display information in German only.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.