Top Historic Sights in Ingolstadt, Germany

Explore the historic highlights of Ingolstadt

St. Moritz Church

Begun in the mid-14th century and completed in 1489, Moritzkirche is a Gothic basilica with a 14th-15th century watchtower.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Ingolstadt, Germany

Ingolstadt New Castle

The New Castle in Ingolstadt is one of the most important Gothic secular buildings of the 15th century in Bavaria. The builders were Louis VII, Duke of Bavaria-Ingolstadt and Duke George the Rich of Bavaria-Landshut, both of the Wittelsbach dynasty. The neighboring Old Castle, a medieval fortress from the 13th Century, is today called Herzogkasten. As a brother of the French queen Isabeau, Ludwig spent more than ten year ...
Founded: 1418 | Location: Ingolstadt, Germany

Ingolstadt M√ľnster

Ingolstadt Münster, built in the 15th century, is one of the largest Gothic brick buildings in Bavaria. Inside, the mighty cathedral houses altars, valuable stone reliefs and figures, paintings and wood carvings. The high altar (1572) commemorates the centenary of the foundation of Ingolstadt"s university.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Ingolstadt, Germany

Asam Church

Without a forecourt or towers and somewhat hidden away in the Old Town, the true magnificence of the Baroque Asam Church Maria de Victoria lies in its stunning interior. Two exceptionally valuable artistic treasures adorn this architectural gem, which was built between 1732 and 1736 as the oratory of the Marian student congregation. The Incarnation of the Lord is the subject of the phenomenal ceiling fresco that was pain ...
Founded: 1732-1736 | Location: Ingolstadt, Germany

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Petersberg Citadel

The Petersberg Citadel is one of the largest extant early-modern citadels in Europe and covers the whole north-western part of the Erfurt city centre. It was built after 1665 on Petersberg hill and was in military use until 1963. It dates from a time when Erfurt was ruled by the Electors of Mainz and is a unique example of the European style of fortress construction. Beneath the citadel is an underground maze of passageways that can be visited on guided tours organised by Erfurt Tourist Office.

The citadel was originally built on the site of a medieval Benedictine Monastery and the earliest parts of the complex date from the 12th century. Erfurt has also been ruled by Sweden, Prussia, Napoleon, the German Empire, the Nazis, and post-World War II Soviet occupying forces, and it was part of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany). All of these regimes used Petersberg Citadel and had an influence on its development. The baroque fortress was in military use until 1963. Since German reunification in 1990, the citadel has undergone significant restoration and it is now open to the public as a historic site.