Ingolstadt New Castle

Ingolstadt, Germany

The New Castle in Ingolstadt is one of the most important Gothic secular buildings of the 15th century in Bavaria. The builders were Louis VII, Duke of Bavaria-Ingolstadt and Duke George the Rich of Bavaria-Landshut, both of the Wittelsbach dynasty. The neighboring Old Castle, a medieval fortress from the 13th Century, is today called Herzogkasten.

As a brother of the French queen Isabeau, Ludwig spent more than ten years in France. After returning to his home city of Ingolstadt, he could draw on abundant finances and in 1418 gave the order to build the new castle following French models. By his death only the foundations had been built. The present structure was built largely on the old foundation until 1489 under the Landshut dukes, as evidenced by the surviving detailed invoices.

In the 1960s, it was re-established by Ministerial decree and the Bavarian Army Museum was opened in 1972, including workshops and restaurants.

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Details

Founded: 1418
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

jay sevra (5 months ago)
Heart of ingolstadt and tourist attraction. Located in old city ingolstadt. Best place to visit.
erdogan yanikoglu (4 years ago)
Being in Ingolstad is very good experience for a traveler in Germany. Aldstad is very well preserved, buildings and streets are in very good condition. Shopping street contains every brand from Primark to Jack Wolfskin. You eat in the cafes.
Erdogan Yanikoglu (4 years ago)
Being in Ingolstad is very good experience for a traveler in Germany. Aldstad is very well preserved, buildings and streets are in very good condition. Shopping street contains every brand from Primark to Jack Wolfskin. You eat in the cafes.
David Nicholas (4 years ago)
The opening hours are not very long in March. Did not get to go inside, but the outside was interesting. Ended up walking around most of the old city, but little was open on a Friday afternoon in March.
David Nicholas (4 years ago)
The opening hours are not very long in March. Did not get to go inside, but the outside was interesting. Ended up walking around most of the old city, but little was open on a Friday afternoon in March.
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