Without a forecourt or towers and somewhat hidden away in the Old Town, the true magnificence of the Baroque Asam Church Maria de Victoria lies in its stunning interior. Two exceptionally valuable artistic treasures adorn this architectural gem, which was built between 1732 and 1736 as the oratory of the Marian student congregation.

The Incarnation of the Lord is the subject of the phenomenal ceiling fresco that was painted by Cosmas Damian Asam, the most well-known Bavarian artist of the Baroque era, at the height of his creativity. This perspectival masterpiece, which is the largest flat ceiling fresco in the world and measures 42 metres by 16 metres, can be best appreciated by walking around beneath it. Another valuable artefact is the Lepanto Monstrance, which was completed in 1708 and stands in the treasure chamber.

This filigree work of art, set in gold and silver, represents the Christians' victory over the Turks in the sea battle of Lepanto - the unique portrayal of a combat on the world's most valuable monstrance.

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Details

Founded: 1732-1736
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

www.ingolstadt-tourismus.de

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carlos Eduardo Fabila Garcinava (17 months ago)
Beautiful church in the downtown of Ingolstadt, totally worth it to visit.
Nicholas Travica (18 months ago)
Amazing architecture!
Azazel Grigori (2 years ago)
Beautiful architecture, well maintained
Alexandra Nechita (2 years ago)
Beautiful church, definitely a must visit in Ingolstadt. There is a 3 euros tax per person to enter.
Anna Clifford (2 years ago)
Stunning flat fresco and religious artifacts. Only $3 for entry - well worth it!
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