Top Historic Sights in Ludwigsburg, Germany

Explore the historic highlights of Ludwigsburg

Ludwigsburg Palace

Ludwigsburg Palace is one of the largest Baroque palaces in Germany and features an enormous garden in that style. From the 18th century to 1918 it was the principal royal palace of the dukedom that became in 1806 the Kingdom of Württemberg. The foundation stone was laid on May 17, 1704 under Duke Eberhard Ludwig of Württemberg (reigning monarch from 1693 to 1733). Begun as a hunting lodge, the project became m ...
Founded: 1704 | Location: Ludwigsburg, Germany

Seeschloss Monrepos

Monrepos is a lakeside palace in Ludwigsburg, Germany. Although quite far from and almost separate from Favorite Palace and Ludwigsburg Palace, by way of pedestrian paths it is connected to the rest of the grounds. It is one of the two minor palaces on the estate, along with the main one. The smaller ones were used as Hunting lodges. Of all three, this is the only one that is still owned by the royal family of Württember ...
Founded: 1714 | Location: Ludwigsburg, Germany

Schloss Favorite

Schloss Favorite is a Baroque hunting lodge built from 1717 to 1723 for the sovereign Duke of Württemberg, Eberhard Ludwig. The architect was Donato Giuseppe Frisoni. From 1806, King Frederick I of Württemberg converted the park into a ménagerie, including deer and chamois. The architect Nikolaus Friedrich von Thouret renovated the building's interior in neoclassical style. In the 20th century, the house was neglecte ...
Founded: 1717-1723 | Location: Ludwigsburg, Germany

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.