Seeschloss Monrepos

Ludwigsburg, Germany

Monrepos is a lakeside palace in Ludwigsburg, Germany. Although quite far from and almost separate from Favorite Palace and Ludwigsburg Palace, by way of pedestrian paths it is connected to the rest of the grounds. It is one of the two minor palaces on the estate, along with the main one. The smaller ones were used as Hunting lodges. Of all three, this is the only one that is still owned by the royal family of Württemberg after their overthrow in 1918. Much of the land surrounding Monrepos and on the Royal part of the estate in general is now used as a golf course, unlike the State owned part, which is made up of parks and museums.

Since the 16th century, the dukes of Württemberg enjoyed hunting along the Eglosheimer Lake. In 1714, Duke Eberhard Ludwig had an octagonal pavilion, the 'Little Lake House', constructed on the northern shore.

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

donalbuno (2 years ago)
Fantastic architecture and stunning buildings and gardens and beautiful sculptures. A great place to visit and enjoy walks in the area
Bochra Mekni (3 years ago)
If you are a nature lover I recommand this place. It's perfect for picnic, families and kids.
sunil agadi (3 years ago)
It is a very Beautiful place to spend some relaxing time, going around a walk on lakeside, enjoyed the Autumn scenary. Good and a pleasant experience. I just Loved it.
Indira Freeman (3 years ago)
Beautiful and historic place near Ludwisburg. Highly recommended. Parking is free and you can take a nice walk around the "large pond" or a paddle boat. Its simply so relaxing and so nice.
Mary Moga (3 years ago)
Beautiful, romantic place. The lake, the trees, the swans...romantic pictures! Unfortunately it looks like a dump place. And that's a pity! You must to visit this place. Good place for families and lovers...
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