Ludwigsburg Palace

Ludwigsburg, Germany

Ludwigsburg Palace is one of the largest Baroque palaces in Germany and features an enormous garden in that style. From the 18th century to 1918 it was the principal royal palace of the dukedom that became in 1806 the Kingdom of Württemberg.

The foundation stone was laid on May 17, 1704 under Duke Eberhard Ludwig of Württemberg (reigning monarch from 1693 to 1733). Begun as a hunting lodge, the project became much more complex and gained momentum over the years.

On August 17, 1709, the duke established the city of Ludwigsburg directly next to his palace, copying the proximity of Versailles to Paris. Previously, the royal palace was the cramped and outdated Old Castle (Altes Schloss) in the heart of Stuttgart. In 1718, Ludwigsburg temporarily became capital and sole residence of the dukes of Württemberg.

In 1733, when construction was complete, the baroque style prevailed in Germany. Eventually, successors of Eberhard Ludwig modified the original design of the palace, especially, Duke Charles Eugene of Württemberg and King Frederick I of Württemberg.

In the 1740s a New Palace was built in Stuttgart, and it was favoured by some of the dukes and kings of Württemberg as their primary residence, but Ludwigsburg remained in use as well. However, under King William I of Württemberg (reigned 1816-84), the palace and especially the gardens gradually decayed because the monarch, in contrast to his predecessors, showed no interest in Ludwigsburg.

Ludwigsburg Palace was not destroyed during World War II, so a renaissance of the complex could start in the mid-20th century. The continuous garden show 'Baroque in Bloom' (Blühendes Barock), that attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, opened in 1953. Today, the palace and its surrounding gardens are presented to the public in a state similar to their appearance around 1800.

The palace theatre (Europe's oldest preserved theatre) and its stage machinery from 1758 are still operational.

Ludwigsburg Palace today contains three museums, Baroque Gallery, Porcelain Museum and Baroque Fashion Museum.

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User Reviews

Dagmar Law (10 months ago)
Got there for 10AM. We had a tour of one half of the castle/chateau. Unfortunately you are not allowed to wonder the chateau by yourself.Our tour guide was phenomenal. I don't know how long he has been a guide. But he certainly knows his stuff. After our tour we went into the gardens, which cost us €10 each. I know it's not a lot to look at, but you have got a Pumpkin exhibition there at the moment. Especially great for kids!
Sam Sadguru (11 months ago)
Nice garden, Pumpkin festival is the attraction during the season. Kids also would love this place. There's a play area with boat ride and a toy train ride.
Nicole Johnston (13 months ago)
Went here Saturday and you have to take a guided tour in German only. It is 45 minutes and they will only let you see 5 rooms. They are nice rooms, but really it is not worth going during corona. You aren't allowed to take pictures inside either. The images online are way better than actually going. Also, the extra museums were all closed.
Sahana Kale (13 months ago)
Must visit. Nice atmosphere. Nice place for family. Kids will definitely enjoy the gardens here and playing places. Attraction like pumpkin decoration were excellent. Must start early in morning to see palace and garden and enjoy fully.
Fakhar Shahzad (14 months ago)
I don't regret a minute, it's beautiful here and as a flower lover I am in paradise. The garden is so beautiful and I can't hold onto every detail. A very nice castle although I haven't taken a tour and only know it from the outside. Because it is so beautiful here, the parking spaces are already very full depending on the season, but I accept that. Highly recommended.
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