Ludwigsburg Palace

Ludwigsburg, Germany

Ludwigsburg Palace is one of the largest Baroque palaces in Germany and features an enormous garden in that style. From the 18th century to 1918 it was the principal royal palace of the dukedom that became in 1806 the Kingdom of Württemberg.

The foundation stone was laid on May 17, 1704 under Duke Eberhard Ludwig of Württemberg (reigning monarch from 1693 to 1733). Begun as a hunting lodge, the project became much more complex and gained momentum over the years.

On August 17, 1709, the duke established the city of Ludwigsburg directly next to his palace, copying the proximity of Versailles to Paris. Previously, the royal palace was the cramped and outdated Old Castle (Altes Schloss) in the heart of Stuttgart. In 1718, Ludwigsburg temporarily became capital and sole residence of the dukes of Württemberg.

In 1733, when construction was complete, the baroque style prevailed in Germany. Eventually, successors of Eberhard Ludwig modified the original design of the palace, especially, Duke Charles Eugene of Württemberg and King Frederick I of Württemberg.

In the 1740s a New Palace was built in Stuttgart, and it was favoured by some of the dukes and kings of Württemberg as their primary residence, but Ludwigsburg remained in use as well. However, under King William I of Württemberg (reigned 1816-84), the palace and especially the gardens gradually decayed because the monarch, in contrast to his predecessors, showed no interest in Ludwigsburg.

Ludwigsburg Palace was not destroyed during World War II, so a renaissance of the complex could start in the mid-20th century. The continuous garden show 'Baroque in Bloom' (Blühendes Barock), that attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, opened in 1953. Today, the palace and its surrounding gardens are presented to the public in a state similar to their appearance around 1800.

The palace theatre (Europe's oldest preserved theatre) and its stage machinery from 1758 are still operational.

Ludwigsburg Palace today contains three museums, Baroque Gallery, Porcelain Museum and Baroque Fashion Museum.

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User Reviews

Monica Mastrangelo (3 months ago)
In this period you can visit this castle with many fascinating Halloween pumpkins. It's a popular tourist destination and it's suitable bouth for adults and children. Tickets cost 10€ on Sundays.
Günter Mcaffy (3 months ago)
I was at the pumpkin at the castle it was really cool and well planned the castle it’s self is also impressive and pretty
Ilkin Rajabov (4 months ago)
Relatively big palace but mostly empty inside. There are several permanent exhibitions but mostly, including the main one, they are waste of money (not of time because not much to see). Of all available at the time only useum of ceramics was of worth visiting, rest you may simply ignore.
Jekaterina Kucinska (4 months ago)
Very beautiful place!
Tania Dominguez (4 months ago)
When you first walk in it seems like it might not be that large, but it is massive. The gardens are beautifully manicured and maintained. There is an entrance fee into the gardens and then a separate fee for the palace tours that you pay for at the palace. They are self guided tours. You must wear a mask inside the palace. The initial part of the tour begins going up a staircase (we had to fold up our stroller and lug it up the stairs: though they did say they have an elevator, we figured we could just beast mode it). It was not crowded at all and we got some great photos of empty rooms. The fairytale garden is so nice. They have a little boat ride for children, which I believe is free. Many little cottages/houses with animatronics . They even have Rapunzel's tower and you can call on her to let down her hair. There are some pretty steep inclines and hills in the fairytale garden, but doable. There is also a carousel in another part of the grounds that you have to pay for. Food vendors past the entrance on the right side. Also some in the fairytale gardens. Overall a great visit and would go again. Also, there is a playground outside of the palace and garden grounds. It is past the parking before you enter the gardens. Stroller friendly. Wagon friendly. We went during the pumpkin festival and there are so many sculptures. Highly recommended.
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