Top Historic Sights in Saarbrücken, Germany

Explore the historic highlights of Saarbrücken

Basilica St. Johann

The Basilica St. Johann was erected by Stengel between 1754 and 1758. It has been painstakingly renovated and is now a perfect example of 18th century Baroque beauty: the pope even granted the church the title “Basilica Minor”. Not to be missed are the bronze portal and the entrance area, which were designed by the Saarbrücken artist Ernst Alt. The church organ is particularly striking. It consists of th ...
Founded: 1754-1758 | Location: Saarbrücken, Germany

Alte Brücke

The Alte Brücke (Old Bridge) was erected by Charles V in 1546 and is one of the oldest constructions in Saarbrücken. The Alte Brücke connects Alt-Saarbrücken and St. Johann. Originally it consisted of 14 arches, but now only 8 remain. It was destroyed during WWII and subsequently rebuilt before being shortened in the early 1960s to make room for the urban expressway which passes through central Saarbr& ...
Founded: 1546 | Location: Saarbrücken, Germany

Saarbrücken Castle

The existence of Saarbrücken was first documented in 999 under the name 'Castellum Sarabrucca'. In the 17th century the castle was rebuilt in the style of the Renaissance, but later destroyed and now only the cellars of this construction remain. In the 18th century Prince Wilhelm Heinrich had his architect Stengel build a new Baroque residence on the same site. Since then the castle has suffered various bou ...
Founded: 18th century | Location: Saarbrücken, Germany

Ludwigskirche

Ludwigskirche in Old Saarbrücken is a Lutheran baroque-style church. It is the symbol of the city and is considered to be one of the most important Protestant churches in Germany. Ludwigskirche and the surrounding Ludwigsplatz were designed as a 'complete work of art', in the sense of a baroque place royale, by Friedrich Joachim Stengel on the commission of Prince William Henry. Construction was begun in 1762. After the ...
Founded: 1768-1775 | Location: Saarbrücken, Germany

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.