Basilica St. Johann

Saarbrücken, Germany

The Basilica St. Johann was erected by Stengel between 1754 and 1758. It has been painstakingly renovated and is now a perfect example of 18th century Baroque beauty: the pope even granted the church the title “Basilica Minor”. Not to be missed are the bronze portal and the entrance area, which were designed by the Saarbrücken artist Ernst Alt.

The church organ is particularly striking. It consists of three individual parts, the main organ and the two choir organs. They can by played individually or together. The St. Johann Basilica organ is hence composed of 60 sounding stops and a total of 4,312 pipes. This remarkable and multifaceted instrument is exceptional in both its construction and its tone spectrum and is renowned far beyond Saarbrücken and the Saarland.

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Details

Founded: 1754-1758
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

More Information

www.saarbruecken.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Heiko Kaum (19 months ago)
Sehr schöne Kirche, sehenswert. Gut geeignet für Stille Momente zur inneren Einkehr.
Florian K. (2 years ago)
Super schöne Kirche im Herzen vom Saarbrücken. Die Gottesdienste sind sehr feierlich und meist gut besucht. Bin gerne dort um mich zu besinnen oder einen Gottesdienst mitzufeiern.
David Rasp (2 years ago)
What a beautiful #church. There are so many details hidden in there. Each time I pay it a visit I discover new symbols. I especially like the hands at the main door which seem to symbolize the four stages of life. It's definitely a very special place.
Povilas Stumbrys (2 years ago)
Labai nuostabus interjeras Buti Saarbrukene ir nepamatyti bazilikos vidaus -tas pats kaip nebuti siame mieste.
Tim Abing (2 years ago)
Die Orgel hat einen unglaublich guten Klang. Es gibt in der Kirche viel zu entdecken, man muss das alles einfach Mal auf sich wirken lassen.
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