Saarbrücken Castle

Saarbrücken, Germany

The existence of Saarbrücken was first documented in 999 under the name 'Castellum Sarabrucca'. In the 17th century the castle was rebuilt in the style of the Renaissance, but later destroyed and now only the cellars of this construction remain. In the 18th century Prince Wilhelm Heinrich had his architect Stengel build a new Baroque residence on the same site. Since then the castle has suffered various bouts of destruction and was partially burnt down and reconstructed before being thoroughly and magnificently renovated in 1989. The architect Gottfried Böhm designed a state-of-the-art central block of steel and glass. The castle is now both an administrative centre and a venue for cultural events, conferences and festivities.

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Details

Founded: 18th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

M M (2 years ago)
While I wouldn't really think of it as a castle (more like a palace built on top of a no longer existing fort), it's worth a visit. The underground tunnels are probably the most popular part, whereas the local history exhibition will feel appealing to specific categories of visitors. As somebody who is especially interested in military history, I must say that the signs were very laconic concerning the 1945 battle for the control of Saarbrücken
Tung Phung (2 years ago)
A nice place for weekend
Samuel B K (2 years ago)
Best place to wander around
Eugen Safin (4 years ago)
The history and surroundings are rather nice. However, this castle is another victim of insensitive modern architecture: The entrance looks hideous.
alice onyango (4 years ago)
Very interesting place. Very nice, helpful, professional and efficient staff. A great eye opener on the actualities of first and second world war and its effects. The staff were able explain everything in terms a six year old could well enjoy the experience.
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In 1034, the castle became capital of the County of Foix and played a decisive role in medieval military history. During the two following centuries, the castle was home to Counts with shining personalities who became the soul of the Occitan resistance during the crusade against the Albigensians. The county became a privileged refuge for persecuted Cathars.

The castle, often besieged (notably by Simon de Montfort in 1211 and 1212), resisted assault and was only taken once, in 1486, thanks to treachery during the war between two branches of the Foix family.

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As seat of the Governor of the Foix region from the 15th century, the castle continued to ensure the defence of the area, notably during the Wars of Religion. Alone of all the castles in the region, it was exempted from the destruction orders of Richelieu (1632-1638).

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Since 1930, the castle has housed the collections of the Ariège départemental museum. Sections on prehistory, Gallo-Roman and mediaeval archaeology tell the history of Ariège from ancient times. Currently, the museum is rearranging exhibits to concentrate on the history of the castle site so as to recreate the life of Foix at the time of the Counts.