Top Historic Sights in Cremona, Italy

Explore the historic highlights of Cremona

Loggia dei Militi

The Loggia dei Militi ('Soldiers" Loggia') is a historical building in Cremona. As reported by an inscription on its façade, it was built in 1292. The Loggia was the seat of assemblies for the local 'Società dei Militi'. It is constituted by two rectangular rooms. Under the portico is the coat of arms of Cremona, moved here from the Margherita Gate when the latter was demolished in 1910.
Founded: 1292 | Location: Cremona, Italy

Cremona Baptistery

The Cremona Baptistery is annexed to the city's Cathedral. Built in 1167, it is characterized by an octagonal plan, a reference to the cult of St. Ambrose of Milan, symbolizing the Eight Day of Resurrection and, thenceforth, the Baptism. The edifice mixes Romanesque and Lombard-Gothic styles, the latter evident in the preference for bare brickwork walls. To the 16th century restorations belong the marble cover of s ...
Founded: 1167 | Location: Cremona, Italy

Cremona Cathedral

Cremona Cathedral bell tower is the famous Torrazzo, symbol of the city and tallest pre-modern tower in Italy. Also adjoining is the baptistery, another important medieval monument. Originally built in Romanesque style, the cathedral has been restored and extended several times, with Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque elements. Construction began in 1107, but the works were damaged and halted after an earthquake in 1117. ...
Founded: 1107 | Location: Cremona, Italy

Archaeological Museum of San Lorenzo

The Museo Archeologico San Lorenzo hosts Roman and Medieval antiquities Cremona. The museum is located on the northern end of Cremona’s historical center, at about a 10 minutes’ walk from the city’s cathedral square. Outside, the museum is admittedly not much impressive; nevertheless, it looks quite better inside. Housed in the former Romanesque church of San Lorenzo (from which the museum takes its name) built i ...
Founded: 2009 | Location: Cremona, Italy

San Michele Church

According to tradition, San Michele Church would have been built by the Lombards, who venerated the archangel St Michael, although its existence is documented from the 8th century, prior to Lombard rule of Cremona. In the 11th century a new basilica was built. In the 13th century it received a new campanile (belfry), and the naves were vaulted with pointed arches. In the crypt are elements dating to the early Middle Ag ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Cremona, Italy

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Angelokastro

Angelokastro is a Byzantine castle on the island of Corfu. It is located at the top of the highest peak of the island"s shoreline in the northwest coast near Palaiokastritsa and built on particularly precipitous and rocky terrain. It stands 305 m on a steep cliff above the sea and surveys the City of Corfu and the mountains of mainland Greece to the southeast and a wide area of Corfu toward the northeast and northwest.

Angelokastro is one of the most important fortified complexes of Corfu. It was an acropolis which surveyed the region all the way to the southern Adriatic and presented a formidable strategic vantage point to the occupant of the castle.

Angelokastro formed a defensive triangle with the castles of Gardiki and Kassiopi, which covered Corfu"s defences to the south, northwest and northeast.

The castle never fell, despite frequent sieges and attempts at conquering it through the centuries, and played a decisive role in defending the island against pirate incursions and during three sieges of Corfu by the Ottomans, significantly contributing to their defeat.

During invasions it helped shelter the local peasant population. The villagers also fought against the invaders playing an active role in the defence of the castle.

The exact period of the building of the castle is not known, but it has often been attributed to the reigns of Michael I Komnenos and his son Michael II Komnenos. The first documentary evidence for the fortress dates to 1272, when Giordano di San Felice took possession of it for Charles of Anjou, who had seized Corfu from Manfred, King of Sicily in 1267.

From 1387 to the end of the 16th century, Angelokastro was the official capital of Corfu and the seat of the Provveditore Generale del Levante, governor of the Ionian islands and commander of the Venetian fleet, which was stationed in Corfu.

The governor of the castle (the castellan) was normally appointed by the City council of Corfu and was chosen amongst the noblemen of the island.

Angelokastro is considered one of the most imposing architectural remains in the Ionian Islands.