Cremona Baptistery

Cremona, Italy

The Cremona Baptistery is annexed to the city's Cathedral. Built in 1167, it is characterized by an octagonal plan, a reference to the cult of St. Ambrose of Milan, symbolizing the Eight Day of Resurrection and, thenceforth, the Baptism. The edifice mixes Romanesque and Lombard-Gothic styles, the latter evident in the preference for bare brickwork walls. To the 16th century restorations belong the marble cover of some walls, the pavement and the baptismal font (1531) and the narthex (1588) of the entrance, in Romanesque style, work by Angelo Nani.

The interior has a 14th-century Crucifix, over the St. John altar, and two wooden statues portraying 'St. Philip Neri' and 'St. John the Baptist' by Giovanni Bertesi. Over the ceiling is a 12th-century statue of the Archangel Gabriel.

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Details

Founded: 1167
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elena S. (15 months ago)
It was not possible to enter to visit it, but nice
Giuseppe Schiavi (travel2travel.it) (2 years ago)
The Baptistery stands imperiously in the main square of Cremona, right next to the Cathedral. Inside you can admire, among others, the baptismal font with the red marble cistern, wooden statues of Christ, the dome and splendid altars. To visit
Giuseppe Schiavi (travel2travel.it) (2 years ago)
The Baptistery stands imperiously in the main square of Cremona, right next to the Cathedral. Inside you can admire, among others, the baptismal font with the red marble cistern, wooden statues of Christ, the dome and splendid altars. To visit
channel max (2 years ago)
True architectural jewel, built starting from 1167 and completed in 200 years !! Inside, in the center, there is a large baptismal font, built in a single block of Valpolicella marble. Wood carvings, frescoes and precious altars make it a masterpiece.
Gabriele Busnelli (2 years ago)
It is decorated in the baptistery of Parma, but communicates a feeling of greater majesty. Explanatory panels tell the story and construction techniques. Entry costs three euros. There is the possibility to purchase a cumulative ticket that also allows access and the ascent to Torrazzo.
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