Top Historic Sights in Gdynia, Poland

Explore the historic highlights of Gdynia

ORP Blyskawica

ORP Błyskawica is a Grom-class destroyer which served in the Polish Navy during World War II and is the only ship of the Polish Navy awarded the Virtuti Militari medal. It is preserved as a museum ship in Gdynia, the oldest preserved destroyer in the world. It was the second of two Grom-class destroyers, built for the Polish Navy by J. Samuel White, Cowes in 1935–37. The name means Lightning. The two Groms were ...
Founded: 1935-1937 | Location: Gdynia, Poland

Dar Pomorza

Dar Pomorza is a Polish sailing frigate built in 1909 which is preserved in Gdynia as a museum ship. It was built in 1909 by Blohm & Voss and dedicated in 1910 by Deutscher Schulschiff-Verein as the German training ship Prinzess Eitel Friedrich. In 1920, following World War I, the ship was taken as war-reparations by Great Britain, then brought to France, where she was assigned to the seamen"s school at St-Nazair ...
Founded: 1909 | Location: Gdynia, Poland

St. Michael the Archangel's Church

St. Michael Archangel church is the oldest building in Gdynia. Originally built by nuns of the Norbertine Order, it replaced a pagan temple in 1224. The church was reduced to a pile of rubble during the war with Sweden in 17th century. After its restoration it served the Catholics until the last days of World War II when the tower was hit by a Soviet cannon ball, fired for fun. Yet again did the Kashubians have to rebuild ...
Founded: 1224 | Location: Gdynia, Poland

Monument to the Victims of December 1970

A monument commemorating the victims of the 1970 strikes which saw militia and army open fire on protestors. The “7” represents one of the fallen strikers being carried by his colleagues and may well be that of Adam Gotner who despite being hit 6 times managed to survive. Unveiled on December 17, 1980 – the tenth anniversary of the strikes and shootings.
Founded: 1980 | Location: Gdynia, Poland

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.