ORP Blyskawica

Gdynia, Poland

ORP Błyskawica is a Grom-class destroyer which served in the Polish Navy during World War II and is the only ship of the Polish Navy awarded the Virtuti Militari medal. It is preserved as a museum ship in Gdynia, the oldest preserved destroyer in the world. It was the second of two Grom-class destroyers, built for the Polish Navy by J. Samuel White, Cowes in 1935–37. The name means Lightning. The two Groms were some of the most heavily-armed and fastest destroyers on the seas before World War II.

Two days before the war, on 30 August 1939, the Błyskawica withdrew, along with the destroyers Grom and Burza, from the Baltic Sea to Britain in accordance with the Peking Plan to avoid open conflict with Germany and possible destruction. From then on they acted in tandem with the Royal Navy's Home Fleet.

During the World War II Błyskawica took part in convoy and patrol duties in Norwegian Coast, Atlantic and Mediterranean. On 7 September 1939, Błyskawica made contact with and attacked a U-Boat, possibly the first combat between the Allied and the German fleets.

After the war, the ship returned to Poland. Since 1 May 1976, it has served as a museum ship in Gdynia.

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Details

Founded: 1935-1937
Category: Museums in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Mcwilliam (15 months ago)
Superb. One of only two surviving second world war destroyers in the world. The other is in Canada. This ship took part in the D Day landings 06.06.1944
John Lassa (2 years ago)
An institution since 1947. Part of the Muzeum Marynarki Wojennej and well worth visiting when next in Gdynia.
Andrey Moiseev (2 years ago)
Very interesting to visit destroyer but regret bridge is closed. It is however amazing to climb around, read about her history. Visit to Engine room is quite impressive, especially for the people who was not on the ship before. It is great to bring kids to share pages of history.
Dheeraj Krishna (2 years ago)
Very well preserved and maintained battle ship with all its weapons. A wonderful place to see different kind of cruse ships and pirate ships with all different kind of design on them.
Karel Jelenovic (2 years ago)
Slightly disappointed. It’s not a bad museum however I was disappointed with finding exactly that inside. A museum. Not the inner ship but a museum which could well be anywhere. You get to see the engine rooms but that’s it. No look on the bridge, limited route around the upper deck, no accommodation or living spaces. Show less
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