Top Historic Sights in Koper, Slovenia

Explore the historic highlights of Koper

Loggia Palace

Loggia Palace is a Venetian palace in Koper and the only preserved Gothic town hall in Slovenia. The earliest part of the existing building dates from 1462, when building work began on a replacement for an earlier Loggia that had stood in the same position on the north side of the main square of Koper, opposite the Praetorian Palace. Following a plague outbreak in Koper in 1553-1555, the facade of the Loggia was embellis ...
Founded: 1462 | Location: Koper, Slovenia

Praetorian Palace

Dominating the southern side of Tito Square is the imposing Praetorian Palace, which has served as the municipal seat for some eight centuries. Its Venetian Gothic design dates from the middle of the 15th century, with the outer staircase and balustrade added fifty years later, and the overall appearance of the façade taking shape in 1664 after significant renovations. After serving various purposes following the d ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Koper, Slovenia

Koper Cathedral

The three-nave Romanesque Koper Cathedral with three apses was built in the second half of the 12th century. The Romanesque construction is preserved on the south side, where typical funnel-shape windows are intact and the stonework is imitated in the facade. Towards the west the church was extended to the bell tower and in 1392 it was Gothicized. The lower floor facade by the square has remained Gothic. The upper floor w ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Koper, Slovenia

Da Ponte Fountain

The Da Ponte Fountain dates from 1666, replacing an older one on the same site. Its superstructure is in the shape of a bridge, surmounting an octagonal water basin surrounded by fifteen pilasters, each bearing the arms of local noble families who had contributed funds toward the fountain. A subaquatic aqueduct connected the island of Koper to the mainland as early as the end of the 14th century. By the 16th century, the ...
Founded: 1666 | Location: Koper, Slovenia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Sirmione Castle

Sirmione castle was built near the end of the 12th century as part of a defensive network surrounding Verona. The castle was maintained and extended first as part of the Veronese protection against their rivals in Milan and later under the control of the Venetian inland empire. The massive fortress is totally surrounded by water and has an inner porch which houses a Roman and Medieval lapidary. From the drawbridge, a staircase leads to the walkways above the walls, providing a marvellous view of the harbour that once sheltered the Scaliger fleet. The doors were fitted with a variety of locking systems, including a drawbridge for horses, carriages and pedestrians, a metal grate and, more recently, double hinged doors. Venice conquered Sirmione in 1405, immediately adopting provisions to render the fortress even more secure, fortifying its outer walls and widening the harbour.

Thanks to its strategical geographical location as a border outpost, Sirmione became a crucial defence and control garrison for the ruling nobles, retaining this function until the 16th century, when its role was taken up by Peschiera del Garda.