Top Historic Sights in Koper, Slovenia

Explore the historic highlights of Koper

Loggia Palace

Loggia Palace is a Venetian palace in Koper and the only preserved Gothic town hall in Slovenia. The earliest part of the existing building dates from 1462, when building work began on a replacement for an earlier Loggia that had stood in the same position on the north side of the main square of Koper, opposite the Praetorian Palace. Following a plague outbreak in Koper in 1553-1555, the facade of the Loggia was embellis ...
Founded: 1462 | Location: Koper, Slovenia

Praetorian Palace

Dominating the southern side of Tito Square is the imposing Praetorian Palace, which has served as the municipal seat for some eight centuries. Its Venetian Gothic design dates from the middle of the 15th century, with the outer staircase and balustrade added fifty years later, and the overall appearance of the façade taking shape in 1664 after significant renovations. After serving various purposes following the d ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Koper, Slovenia

Koper Cathedral

The three-nave Romanesque Koper Cathedral with three apses was built in the second half of the 12th century. The Romanesque construction is preserved on the south side, where typical funnel-shape windows are intact and the stonework is imitated in the facade. Towards the west the church was extended to the bell tower and in 1392 it was Gothicized. The lower floor facade by the square has remained Gothic. The upper floor w ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Koper, Slovenia

Da Ponte Fountain

The Da Ponte Fountain dates from 1666, replacing an older one on the same site. Its superstructure is in the shape of a bridge, surmounting an octagonal water basin surrounded by fifteen pilasters, each bearing the arms of local noble families who had contributed funds toward the fountain. A subaquatic aqueduct connected the island of Koper to the mainland as early as the end of the 14th century. By the 16th century, the ...
Founded: 1666 | Location: Koper, Slovenia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the largest Roman triumphal arch. The arch spans the Via triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph.

Though dedicated to Constantine, much of the decorative material incorporated earlier work from the time of the emperors Trajan (98-117), Hadrian (117-138) and Marcus Aurelius (161-180), and is thus a collage. The last of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, it is also the only one to make extensive use of spolia, reusing several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments, which give a striking and famous stylistic contrast to the sculpture newly created for the arch.

The arch is 21 m high, 25.9 m wide and 7.4 m deep. Above the archways is placed the attic, composed of brickwork reveted (faced) with marble. A staircase within the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, on the west side, facing the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modelled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Roman Forum.