Da Ponte Fountain

Koper, Slovenia

The Da Ponte Fountain dates from 1666, replacing an older one on the same site. Its superstructure is in the shape of a bridge, surmounting an octagonal water basin surrounded by fifteen pilasters, each bearing the arms of local noble families who had contributed funds toward the fountain.

A subaquatic aqueduct connected the island of Koper to the mainland as early as the end of the 14th century. By the 16th century, the 10,000 inhabitants of the city were facing a water shortage, rainwater cisterns having become inadequate. In the 17th century, Niccolò Manzuoli recorded the city water supply, noting that a 2-mile distant spring at Colonna was piped to the island via wooden underwater tubes, some of which have been unearthed during excavations by modern archeologists.

The water spurts from four mascarons at the base of the arch. The fountain was used as a source of potable water until 1898.

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    Details

    Founded: 1666
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    en.wikipedia.org

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    4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Leon Krizman (6 months ago)
    nice place beautyful fountain
    ian Manchester (7 months ago)
    Quiet,pleasant tourist resort
    Nigel Robinson (8 months ago)
    great place a must see on any trip
    Dar Veter Larikov (9 months ago)
    Very nice place to hang out
    Jeremy Aylor (10 months ago)
    Pretty fountain near gate
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