Da Ponte Fountain

Koper, Slovenia

The Da Ponte Fountain dates from 1666, replacing an older one on the same site. Its superstructure is in the shape of a bridge, surmounting an octagonal water basin surrounded by fifteen pilasters, each bearing the arms of local noble families who had contributed funds toward the fountain.

A subaquatic aqueduct connected the island of Koper to the mainland as early as the end of the 14th century. By the 16th century, the 10,000 inhabitants of the city were facing a water shortage, rainwater cisterns having become inadequate. In the 17th century, Niccolò Manzuoli recorded the city water supply, noting that a 2-mile distant spring at Colonna was piped to the island via wooden underwater tubes, some of which have been unearthed during excavations by modern archeologists.

The water spurts from four mascarons at the base of the arch. The fountain was used as a source of potable water until 1898.

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    Founded: 1666
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    en.wikipedia.org

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    User Reviews

    Nikos N (13 months ago)
    Beautiful fountain. A must-see in Koper.
    Vaclav Rehak (19 months ago)
    Nice, I can just say, go and enjoy IT.
    Zoran Velkov (20 months ago)
    It's beautiful and quiet place with old architecture....
    Mike Visser (2 years ago)
    A historic fountain in the square art Koper, Slovenias Port on the Adriatic. They were having an iron man weekend when we were passing through and it was very well supported, if I recall correctly, over a thousand participants. Surrounded by Cafes, this is part of what I would rate a delightful coastal town. The cruise ship was in Port too bumping tourist numbers. I can see why the cruise ship stops here, a lovely little Port town.
    Rachel Balfour (2 years ago)
    Small town but we enjoyed walking around Kotor. We visited on a Sunday, so very quiet. Give the gals at the Lord Byron Pub and Cafe seated area outside. Lovely bit of shade & one of the best coffees I have ever had!
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