Top Historic Sights in Enköping, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Enköping

Vårfrukyrkan

Vårfrukyrkan (Our Lady’s Church) was built in the 12th century in the same style as Sigtuna and Old Uppsala churches. The star vaulting and enlargement were completed in the 15th century. The wooden tower was added in 1839. There are remains medieval mural paintings as well as newer painted by C. W. Petterson in 1904.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Enköping Monastery Ruins

The Franciscan Monastery in Enköping was built during the 1200s, probably around 1250. The founder is alleged to have been a Peter Olai from Roskilde. In a letter to the monastery from 1275 Master Palne asks to be buried there, when his wife is already buried in the monastery. For this, he promises a large sum of money, a boat and a tent as gifts to the monastery. The monastery was reconstructed several times during ...
Founded: ca. 1250 | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Härkeberga Church

Härkeberga church was built in the early 1300s and was enlarged in the 1400s with the vestry and porch. Also vaults were added then. Albertus Pictor decorated arches and walls with murals in the mid 1480's. The wall paintings were restored in the 1930s. The paintings in Härkeberga church are Albertus Pictor's finest works. The stories originate from both the Old and New Testaments. They relate to the Biblia Pauperum, a ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Grönsö Castle

Grönsö (or Grönsöö) Castle was built in 1607-1610 by the Privy Council Johan Skytte. The building was constructed of brick and granite in a French style with pitched roof, ridge turrets and four rectangular corner towers. The ground floor can still be seen today with well-preserved interiors and painted ceilings from the 1600s. Family Skytte owned Grönsö throughout the 1600s until it wa ...
Founded: 1607-1610 | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Veckholm Church

Veckholm Church was built in the late 13th century and the sacristy and porch were added in 1400s. The chancel was added in the 1500s and the magnificent tomb of famous de la Gardie family in the 1600s. The font of Veckholm church date from the 12th century and the altar was made in Brussels around 1500. The pulpit has been donated by Johan Pontusson de la Gardie.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Teda Church

Teda Church was originally built around the year 1200 and enlarged strongly about 100 years later. The star-shape vaulting was made in the 1500s. The mural paintings were made in two phases in the early 1600s. The chapel was addded in 1680s for Arvid Ivarsson Natt och Dag. The oldest item in the church is a font made in the Middle Ages. There is a date 1644 carved to the pulpit. The organs and benches date from the 18th ...
Founded: ca. 1200 | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Hacksta Church

The stone church of Hacksta date from the 13th century. It has been enlarged and restored several times. The mural paintigs were overpainted, but restored in 1981. There are several valuable artefacts in the church, like two medieval sculptures. The pulpit was made in 1680 and restored in 1822.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Rickeby Rock Carvings

Rickeby is known of its Bronze Age rock carvings. The area contains about 50 carvings displaying for example humans and animals.
Founded: 1700-500 BC | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Kungs-Husby Church

Kungs-Husby Church date from the 14th century and it was enlarged between 1755-57. The medieval frescoes in walls were overpainted in the 18th century, but restored in 1859. The triumph crucifix (made in the 1200s) date probably from the elder wooden church. The limestone madonna statue was made in Rheinland around the year 1340. The Gustavian Classicism style pulpit was carved in 1789 by J. C. Krüger.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hagios Demetrios

The Church of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios, is the main sanctuary dedicated to Saint Demetrius, the patron saint of Thessaloniki. It is part of the site Palaeochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki on the list of World Heritage Sites by UNESCO since 1988.

The first church on the spot was constructed in the early 4th century AD, replacing a Roman bath. A century later, a prefect named Leontios replaced the small oratory with a larger, three-aisled basilica. Repeatedly gutted by fires, the church eventually was reconstructed as a five-aisled basilica in 629–634. This was the surviving form of the church much as it is today. The most important shrine in the city, it was probably larger than the local cathedral. The historic location of the latter is now unknown.

The church had an unusual shrine called the ciborium, a hexagonal, roofed structure at one side of the nave. It was made of or covered with silver. The structure had doors and inside was a couch or bed. Unusually, it did not hold any physical relics of the saint. The ciborium seems to have been a symbolic tomb. It was rebuilt at least once.

The basilica is famous for six extant mosaic panels, dated to the period between the latest reconstruction and the inauguration of the Byzantine Iconoclasm in 730. These mosaics depict St. Demetrius with officials responsible for the restoration of the church (called the founders, ktetors) and with children. An inscription below one of the images glorifies heaven for saving the people of Thessalonica from a pagan Slavic raid in 615.

Thessaloniki became part of the Ottoman Empire in 1430. About 60 years later, during the reign of Bayezid II, the church was converted into a mosque, known as the Kasımiye Camii after the local Ottoman mayor, Cezeri Kasım Pasha. The symbolic tomb however was kept open for Christian veneration. Other magnificent mosaics, recorded as covering the church interior, were lost either during the four centuries when it functioned as a mosque (1493–1912) or in the Great Thessaloniki Fire of 1917 that destroyed much of the city. It also destroyed the roof and upper walls of the church. Black-and-white photographs and good watercolour versions give an idea of the early Byzantine craftsmanship lost during the fire.

Following the Great Fire of 1917, it took decades to restore the church. Tombstones from the city"s Jewish cemetery - destroyed by the Greek and Nazi German authorities - were used as building materials in these restoration efforts in the 1940s. Archeological excavations conducted in the 1930s and 1940s revealed interesting artifacts that may be seen in a museum situated inside the church"s crypt. The excavations also uncovered the ruins of a Roman bath, where St. Demetrius was said to have been held prisoner and executed. A Roman well was also discovered. Scholars believe this is where soldiers dropped the body of St. Demetrius after his execution. After restoration, the church was reconsecrated in 1949.