Vårfrukyrkan (Our Lady’s Church) was built in the 12th century in the same style as Sigtuna and Old Uppsala churches. The star vaulting and enlargement were completed in the 15th century. The wooden tower was added in 1839. There are remains medieval mural paintings as well as newer painted by C. W. Petterson in 1904.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Address

Genvägen, Enköping, Sweden
See all sites in Enköping

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Birgitta Lidgren (9 months ago)
Sagolikt vacker kyrka, varsamt renoverad. Historiskt viktig. Kunnig guide
Torbjorn Wirf (2 years ago)
One of Sweden's most beautiful churches. Located high above Enköping. Albert Pictor's paintings inside the church are fantastic. A must if you like churches or visit Enköping.
Simon Larsson (2 years ago)
An impressive church in build and location, overlooking the town from atop the esker, and a very pretty one inside. The ceiling and wall paintings are worthy of a visit themselves, but there are also many interesting relics to behold. More accessible and complete historical information would have earned this place a full score, but it is nevertheless well worth at least a quick visit.
Simon Larsson (2 years ago)
An impressive church in build and location, overlooking the town from atop the esker, and a very pretty one inside. The ceiling and wall paintings are worthy of a visit themselves, but there are also many interesting relics to behold. More accessible and complete historical information would have earned this place a full score, but it is nevertheless well worth at least a quick visit.
Lars Krog (3 years ago)
Very fine Church on the top of the town
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