Top Historic Sights in Vetlanda, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Vetlanda

Fröderyd Church

The oldest known church on the site was built in the 13th century. The medieval church was demolished in 1854 and replaced with a new one designed by Sven Sjöholm and J. A. Hawerman. This church was destroyed by lightning in 1943. The present church was built in 1946-1947. The medieval font and altarpiece (painted in the mid-19th century) have survived. The other interior date from 1940s.
Founded: 1946-1947 | Location: Vetlanda, Sweden

Hultaby Castle Ruins

The building of Hultaby Castle was begun in the second half of the 13th century and it was inhabited in the middle of the 14th century by the Swedish councillor of the realm and earl of the Orkney Islands, Erengisle Sunesson (Bååt). Together with the castle itself, which is 28 by 32 metres, the castle area consists of a group of 10 building foundations, which lie in an L-formation on the southern and eastern ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Vetlanda, Sweden

Lannaskede Old Church

The old church of Lannaskede is one of Sweden's oldest Romanesque churches. It was built in 1150. Inside the church there is an organ that is the country's oldest working organ. Like other organs from the 16th and 17th centuries, it has a carillon. The mural paintings dating back to the 12th century are also well-preserved.
Founded: 1150 | Location: Vetlanda, Sweden

Näsby Church

Näsby church was built in the 12th century, and the cristening font dates back to that time. Näsby is the parish of country seats, something that has influenced the design of the church. Today, this can be seen in the magnificent coats of arms of the Silversparre, Silfverhielm and Patkull families. During the 1720s, the church was extended with a cross-arm to the north when the altar was moved to the southern wa ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Vetlanda, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Montparnasse Cemetery

Montparnasse Cemetery was created from three farms in 1824. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the closure, owing to health concerns, of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786. Several new cemeteries outside the precincts of the capital replaced all the internal Parisian ones in the early 19th century: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, and today sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery.

Montparnasse cemetery is the burial place of many of France's intellectual and artistic elite as well as publishers and others who promoted the works of authors and artists. There are also many graves of foreigners who have made France their home, as well as monuments to police and firefighters killed in the line of duty in the city of Paris.

The cemetery is divided by Rue Émile Richard. The small section is usually referred to as the small cemetery (petit cimetière) and the large section as the big cemetery (grand cimetière).

Although Baudelaire is buried in this cemetery (division 6), there is also a cenotaph to him (between division 26 and 27). Because of the many notable people buried there, it is a highly popular tourist attraction.