Hultaby Castle Ruins

Vetlanda, Sweden

The building of Hultaby Castle was begun in the second half of the 13th century and it was inhabited in the middle of the 14th century by the Swedish councillor of the realm and earl of the Orkney Islands, Erengisle Sunesson (Bååt).

Together with the castle itself, which is 28 by 32 metres, the castle area consists of a group of 10 building foundations, which lie in an L-formation on the southern and eastern sides of the castle. There used to be an additional fifteen or so buildings spread out outside the castle area. The upper part of the castle, which consisted of a great room, two minor rooms and a tower, and the surrounding buildings, were of timber.

The castle is thought to have been burnt by Count Henrik of Holstein (known as “Järn Henrik”, Iron Henrik), the bailiff of King Albrecht, during the 1360s, at which time there was civil strife between the rival Swedish kings Magnus Eriksson and Albrecht of Mecklenburg.

The area around the old ruins shows many traces of the old cultivated landscape. Apart from the mounds of stones left by the farming of times past, there also remain plants that are favoured by hay making and grazing, such as leopard’s bane, greater yellow-rattle and common milkwort.

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Address

Karlslund 1, Vetlanda, Sweden
See all sites in Vetlanda

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.vetlanda.se

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Lindahl (4 months ago)
Nice view ..
Michelle T. (10 months ago)
Nice ruin located near a beautiful lake. Great place for a picnic and a short rest.
biffen,s bass boosted (11 months ago)
ok
Jörgen Agerskov (2 years ago)
Here we are talking about old culture. From time immemorial
Jörgen Agerskov (2 years ago)
Here we are talking about old culture. From time immemorial
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