Fröderyd Church

Vetlanda, Sweden

The oldest known church on the site was built in the 13th century. The medieval church was demolished in 1854 and replaced with a new one designed by Sven Sjöholm and J. A. Hawerman. This church was destroyed by lightning in 1943. The present church was built in 1946-1947.

The medieval font and altarpiece (painted in the mid-19th century) have survived. The other interior date from 1940s.

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Details

Founded: 1946-1947
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kenne Nygren (16 months ago)
Very nice
Kenne Nygren (16 months ago)
Very nice
romywebb se (16 months ago)
Fröderyd Church is a large nice white church building with a nice and pleasant cemetery. Framed by a wonderful old stone wall. The back faces nature and gives a certain feeling of stillness. The interior of the church appeals to me a lot with nice colors and details. The church is located opposite Lina Sandell Gården in Fröderyd. There is parking opposite the church and next to the church bus stop with glass bus shelter. Apparently there is no handicap entrance / ramp to the church.
romywebb se (16 months ago)
Fröderyd Church is a large nice white church building with a nice and pleasant cemetery. Framed by a wonderful old stone wall. The back faces nature and gives a certain feeling of stillness. The interior of the church appeals to me a lot with nice colors and details. The church is located opposite Lina Sandell Gården in Fröderyd. There is parking opposite the church and next to the church bus stop with glass bus shelter. Apparently there is no handicap entrance / ramp to the church.
Claes Dahl (16 months ago)
Rogivande is always a cemetery, with an acquaintance and watered on his father's grave, not been inside the church.
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