Fröderyd Church

Vetlanda, Sweden

The oldest known church on the site was built in the 13th century. The medieval church was demolished in 1854 and replaced with a new one designed by Sven Sjöholm and J. A. Hawerman. This church was destroyed by lightning in 1943. The present church was built in 1946-1947.

The medieval font and altarpiece (painted in the mid-19th century) have survived. The other interior date from 1940s.

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Details

Founded: 1946-1947
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

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User Reviews

romywebb se (2 years ago)
Fröderyd Kyrka är en stor fin vit kyrkobyggnad med en trevlig och behaglig kyrkogård. Inramad av en underbar gammal stenmur. Baksidan vetter mot naturen och inger en viss känslan av stillhet. Kyrkan ligger mittemot Lina Sandell Gården i Fröderyd. Det finns parkering mittemot kyrkan och bredvid kyrkan busshållplats med busskur i glas. Till synes finns ingen handikappingång /ramp till kyrkan.
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