Medieval churches in Denmark

Seest Church

Seest Church consists of a Romanesque choir and the ship, originally the apse, and a late medieval tower in the west. A late medieval porch in front southern door was demolished by the mid-1800s. The walls of chancel and nave is of field stone, and space has retained his flat beam ceilings. Arc is a brick wall on the Renaissance, possibly from 1539. During restoration 1963-64, led by architect JK Jepsen, Kolding, was afte ...
Founded: c. 1400 | Location: Kolding, Denmark

Sønder Starup Church

Sønder Starup Church is a Romanesque church dating from c. 1100.  The tower was erected around 1450.
Founded: c .1100 | Location: Haderslev, Denmark

Tandslet Church

Tandslet Church was built around 1200. The wooden bell tower was built also in the Middle Ages and it is situated in the Bronze Age burial mound. Frescoes dates from the late Middle Ages and pulpit from 1576. Altarpiece was made by Aabenraa artist Jes Jessen, from 1798. Organs were built 1863 by Marcussen & Son, Aabenraa.
Founded: c. 1200 | Location: Sønderborg, Denmark

Varnæs Church

Varnæs Church dates from c. 1150, the baptismal font is original. The Baldachin reredos of oak is from around 1475. The renaissance style pulpit with wooden carving dates from 1606, and the crucifix circa 1250. St. Jørgens chapel on the south side was added in the 14th century, here were held services for lepers. The organ was made by Marcussen & Son, 1892. In cemetery stands a war memorial for the fallen during Wor ...
Founded: c. 1150 | Location: Aabenraa, Denmark

Allerup Church

Allerup church was mentioned first time between 1307 and 1433 and probably built in the first half of 14th century. It was dedicated to St. Jacob. The tower was added in 1495-1505. The altar table is from the 14th century, the clock from 1504 and altarpiece from 1525.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Odense, Denmark

Agedrup Church

Agedrup Church was built in the Romanesque style in the 12th century. 
Founded: 12th century | Location: Odense, Denmark

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.