Monasteries in Sweden

Riseberga Abbey Ruins

Riseberga Abbey was a nunnery founded by the Order of Cistercians around the year 1180. The land property of the abbey was donated by Earl Birger Brosa in 1202. After his death Brosa’s wife, Queen consort Brigida Haraldsdotter, moved to Riseberga and she was one of the most famous nuns in the abbey. Brigida has also buried there. Riseberga became soon very rich and powerful abbey. In the 13th century it owned 224 f ...
Founded: ca. 1180 | Location: Fjugesta, Sweden

Gudsberga Abbey Ruins

Gudsberga Abbey (Gudsberga Kloster) was a Cistercian abbey established in 1486. It was the last Cistercian abbey in Sweden. Gudsberga owned farms, manors, foundries and mines until 1527, when it was reduced to the Crown during Reformation. In 1538 and 1544 King Gustav Vasa ordered to send silver from abbey to Stockholm. It was demolished later. Today some stone foundations remain and there is a museum exhibiting the forg ...
Founded: 1486 | Location: Hedemora, Sweden

Ramundeboda Abbey Ruins

Ramundeboda Abbey belonged to the Hospital Brothers of St. Anthony and was established in the late 1400s. This was the only Antonines monastery in Sweden. After Reformation abbey"s properties were seized in 1527. After that there was an inn until 1800s and the Ramundeboda Church between 1686-1688. The church was moved to Laxå in 1899.
Founded: c. 1475 | Location: Finnerödja, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Monet's Garden

Claude Monet lived for forty-three years, from 1883 to 1926, in Giverny. With a passion for gardening as well as for colours, he conceived both his flower garden and water garden as true works of art. Walking through his house and gardens, visitors can still feel the atmosphere which reigned at the home of the Master of Impressionnism and marvel at the floral compositions and nymphéas, his greatest sources of inspiration.

In 1890 Monet had enough money to buy the house and land outright and set out to create the magnificent gardens he wanted to paint. Some of his most famous paintings were of his garden in Giverny, famous for its rectangular Clos normand, with archways of climbing plants entwined around colored shrubs, and the water garden, formed by a tributary to the Epte, with the Japanese bridge, the pond with the water lilies, the wisterias and the azaleas.

Today the Monet's Garden is open to the public.