World War II sites in Normandy

Champigny-St. André War Cemetery

The German war cemetery Champigny-St. André contains 19,809 German graves from the World War II. There is also a mass grave with 816 casualties. Of these, 303 are identified. They were brought together to this cemetery from the regions Eure, Orne, Seine-Maritime, Eure-et-Loire and Seine-et-Oisne.
Founded: 1944 | Location: Champigny-la-Futelaye, France

Banneville-La-Campagne War Cemetery

For the most part, the men buried at Banneville-la-Campagne War Cemetery were killed in the fighting from the second week of July 1944, when Caen was captured, to the last week in August, when the Falaise Gap had been closed and the Allied forces were preparing their advance beyond the Seine. The cemetery contains 2,170 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 140 of them unidentified, and five Polish graves.
Founded: 1944 | Location: Sannerville, France

Pointe du Hoc

Pointe du Hoc is a promontory with a 30m cliff overlooking the English Channel. During World War II it was the highest point between Utah Beach to the west and Omaha Beach to the east. The German army fortified the area with concrete casemates and gun pits. On D-Day (6 June 1944) the United States Army Ranger Assault Group assaulted and captured Pointe du Hoc after scaling the cliffs. Six French-made 155 m ...
Founded: 1944 | Location: Saint-Pierre-du-Mont, France

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Lund Cathedral

Lund Cathedral was consecrated in 1145, and contains many well-known artefacts and features of considerable historical interest. Since then service has been held here every day for almost 900 years. Today over 700 000 persons visit the church each year with some 85 000 who attends a service.

The first cathedral was built in Lund before 1085, but it is difficult to know if the present building was built in the same place. The Cathedral School was established in 1085, making it Denmark's oldest school. The building of the present Cathedral began in 1080s. Its first Archbishop, Ascer, consecrated the high altar in the Crypt in 1123; and his successor, Archbishop Eskil, then consecrated the main cathedral building in 1145.

During the 16th century the Cathedral was restored by the West-phalian stone mason, Adam van Düren, and his sculptured figures can be seen in several parts of the building. In the 19th century the Cathedral was again thoroughly renovated, first by C.G. Brunius, and then by Helgo Zettervall. Further restoration work was undertaken in the period 1954-63 by Eiler Graebe.

Among the Cathedral’s many attractions, there is the magnificent horological artistic masterpiece, Horologium mirabili Lundense, dating from 1424. This early time and dating machine is still in working order with it rotating mechanical figures marking the passage of time. The Crypt is yet guarded by the figure of Giant Finn. There are also three rare bronze pillars with mounted statues from around 1240. The finely carved oak choir stalls are from the middle of the 14th century; and the majestic altar dates from 1398. On the other hand, the fine Absidens mosaic by Joakim Skovgaard, is from the 1920´s.