Orglandes War Cemetery

Orglandes, France

Orglandes War Cemetery is a German World War II cemetery in Normandy, France. The 10,152 burials come from summer 1944, immediately following D-Day and the Battle of Normandy. The entrance is marked by a small house surmounted by a bell-tower. The cemetery consists of 28 rows of graves, each grave marked by a stone cross. Each cross details the name, date of birth and date of death of each of the six or more dead soldiers buried to each cross.

The cemetery is administered by the German War Graves Commission, the Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge. The landscaping was completed in 1958 and the cemetery was inaugurated on September 20, 1961.

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Address

D24 28-48, Orglandes, France
See all sites in Orglandes

Details

Founded: 1944
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gorik Van Droogenbroeck (10 months ago)
Sober, well maintained.
Laurent Liger (2 years ago)
A big thank you to Mr. Aimable who maintains the green spaces of this cemetery, for his availability and kindness.
mcrafter2012 (2 years ago)
well-kept cemetery. A place of history.
Bruno Defrance (2 years ago)
Very sober, respect. Unmissable D-day site.
Lag Adu (2 years ago)
Quiet, clean, impressive cemetery.
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