The Stari Grad Plain of the town of Stari Grad on the island of Hvar is an agricultural landscape that was set up by the ancient Greek colonists in the 4th century BC, and remains in use. The plain is generally still in its original form. The ancient layout has been preserved by careful maintenance of the stone walls over 24 centuries, along with the stone shelters (known locally as trims), and the water collection system. The same crops, mainly grapes and olives, are still grown in the fields, and the site is also a natural reserve. The site is a valuable example of the ancient Greek system of agriculture.

The plain demonstrates the comprehensive system of agriculture as used by the ancient Greeks. The land was divided into geometrical parcels (chora) bounded by dry stone walls. The system included a rainwater recovery system involving the use of gutters and storage cisterns. The original field layout has been respected by the continuous maintenance of the boundary walls by succeeding generations. Agricultural activity in the chora has been uninterrupted for 24 centuries up to the present day. What we see today is a continuation of the cultural landscape of the original Greek colonists.

The Stari Grad Plain is Croatia's 7th location protected by UNESCO.

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Stari Grad, Croatia
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Founded: 4th century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Croatia

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Volodymyr Balych (11 months ago)
We were here just for a walking. A bit boring to be honest. Nothing special if you're young. It looks like just ordinary plains .
igor duzevic (11 months ago)
My working place
Ellie Rylah (14 months ago)
The wine tasting was really nice, and had a nice setting overlooking the vineyard. However, the donkeys did not have any water or shade, and it was extremely sunny and hot. This was a real shame and ruined the enjoyment of the wine tasting - hence the lack of stars. Please look after your animals if you are going to have them as part of your tourist attraction!
Jess Moya (2 years ago)
If you want an amazing wine and olive tasting experience, look no further. Make sure to make reservations ahead of time, as they may be booked up in advance. (I’m writing this review on the plain’s listing since their winery doesn’t have one yet).
John Pope (2 years ago)
Fun time tasting their good wines with explanations on the process and varietals used. Also taken through the olive oil and lavender production processes.
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