Hvar Cathedral

Hvar, Croatia

The most impressive building in Hvar is definitely the Cathedral of St. Stephen, standing on the eastern side of the city square, at the far end of the Pjaca, where two parts of the city meet. It was built on the site of an early 6th-century Christian church and a later Benedictine convent of St Mary.

The shrine of today's cathedral is the remains of a Gothic church from the 14th century. Its 15th-century pulpit, the stone polyptychs of St. Luke and The Flagellation of Christ, as well as the late Gothic crucifix, have all been preserved. St. Stephen's is a rather unremarkable triple-aisled church with a nice 17th-century bell tower, and is a harmonious synthesis of the Renaissance, manneristic and early Baroque styles so typical of the Dalmatian architecture of the 15th and 16th centuries.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Malcolm Young (6 months ago)
The scenic vista of the square, I didn't look inside but others say, it'll cost you.
Yihang Zuo (9 months ago)
I love the architecture! It looks elegant!
Pedja Ivkovic (2 years ago)
Interesting look from outside, but I don't remember too many countries where you need to pay to enter church! 10kn entrance, and I dont see that there is anything special to see
Duygu Gunes (3 years ago)
Ticket is 10 HKN but you can’t go up the tower. Might be more of a thing for people with a better knowledge of Christian history. Otherwise not much to see inside.
Tanner West (3 years ago)
Absolutely gorgeous. The entire island is gorgeous. Split and Dubrovnik are pretty but Hvar feels far more authentic.
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