Hvar Cathedral

Hvar, Croatia

The most impressive building in Hvar is definitely the Cathedral of St. Stephen, standing on the eastern side of the city square, at the far end of the Pjaca, where two parts of the city meet. It was built on the site of an early 6th-century Christian church and a later Benedictine convent of St Mary.

The shrine of today's cathedral is the remains of a Gothic church from the 14th century. Its 15th-century pulpit, the stone polyptychs of St. Luke and The Flagellation of Christ, as well as the late Gothic crucifix, have all been preserved. St. Stephen's is a rather unremarkable triple-aisled church with a nice 17th-century bell tower, and is a harmonious synthesis of the Renaissance, manneristic and early Baroque styles so typical of the Dalmatian architecture of the 15th and 16th centuries.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Miro Miljković (3 months ago)
Very nice. Worth checking
Dario (14 months ago)
Nice square, best to photograph in the early morning or twilight for the lighting.
Karim Tarek Sorour (15 months ago)
One of the most impressive cathedrals in Central Europe. The whole square is great to walk around and enjoy.
Michael Gosden (15 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral and a lovely piazza with very pretty houses - especially at night when the lights are amazing!
David Bisset (16 months ago)
The cathedral is a good example of Dalmatian Renaissance with an adjoining romanesque bell tower. Inside the altars are mostly baroque with somewhat mediocre paintings. A great highlight is two ambos from the previous cathedral. The building is open in the morning and late afternoon; there is a small fee.
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