Château d'Entraygues was built by Henry II, Count of Rodez, between 1278 and 1290. Entraygues was a strategic point at the crossroads of transportation routes, at the junction of Auvergne and the Lot Valley.

The first conurbation must have been at St-Georges (remains an old,  Gothic style edifice, far more important when it was a parish church, on a terrace).

From the end of the construction of the fortifed castle, in 1290, the town battlements were built with crenels, defence towers and front doors (there would have been a drawbridge on each side), the whole surrounded by moats. 

The castle was looted and detroyed in 1587. Partially razed in 1604, it was rebuilt in the 17th century by Henri de Monvallat, the new lord of Entraygues. From the 13th century, only remain the two towers, the stairwell, the left vaulted room of the ground floor. From the fortifications, only remain some sections of the castle's outer wall, front doors of which archways have been removed in the 19th century during the construction of the new church partly inaugurated on October 24th 1866. Most of the old round towers were removed  then and their stones were used to build the religious edifice.

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Details

Founded: 1278-1290
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

www.tourisme-entraygues.com

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christophe Cuche (2 years ago)
Beautiful building
Gorbio Roger (2 years ago)
Well restored
Alain Gaillard (2 years ago)
A short stop to stretch your legs at the confluence of the Lot and Truyère rivers. Restful.
Jean Rudzinski (2 years ago)
The calm of the site and the murmur of the stream inspire complete rest
Bob Nicholas (4 years ago)
Only viewed from outside. Don't know if you can visit inside.
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