Cefalù Cathedral

Cefalù, Italy

The Cathedral of Cefalù is one of nine structures included in the UNESCO World Heritage Site known as Arab-Norman Palermo and the Cathedral Churches of Cefalù and Monreale.

The cathedral was erected between 1131 and 1240 in the Norman architectural style, the island of Sicily having been conquered by the Normans in 1091. According to tradition, the building was erected after a vow made to the Holy Saviour by the King of Sicily, Roger II, after he escaped from a storm to land on the city's beach. The building has a fortress-like character and, seen from a distance, it dominates the skyline of the surrounding medieval town. It made a powerful statement of the Norman presence.

The façade is characterized by two large Norman towers with mullioned windows, each surmounted by a small spire added in the 15th century. Each spire is different: one has a square plan surrounded by flame-shaped merlons, the latter symbolizing the Papal authority and the mitre and the other has an octagonal plan and Ghibelline merlons, symbolizing the royal and temporal power.

Inside the cathedral the dominant figure of the decorative scheme is the bust of Christ Pantokrator, portrayed on the semi-dome of the apse with a hand raised in Benediction.

The basilica houses several funerary monuments, including a late Antique sarcophagus, a medieval one, and the notable sepulchre of the Bishop Castelli of the 18th century.

Excavations in the cathedral area have brought to light parts of a 6th-century polychrome mosaic. They depict a dove drinking, parts of two other birds, two small trees, and a lily-shaped flower, enclosed in a frame with ogival and lozenge motifs. This mosaic belonged probably to a pre-existing Byzantine basilica. 

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Details

Founded: 1131-1240
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
study.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wendy Taylor (3 months ago)
Really worth a visit. I recommend the Red tour that includes everything. Very well organised, the people who work here are helpful and informative.
pts pts (4 months ago)
Amazing Fortress Church of early Norman Design. Absolutely must-see if you are here
Carol Hart (4 months ago)
Beautiful site. Had a delicious gelato and walked along the quaint streets of Cefalu.
M (5 months ago)
Magnificent cathedral. You can see the mosaics and the architecture for free, I felt there was little added value in paying 10 euros for the ticket.
Laura Cannici (7 months ago)
Norman cathedral surrounded by a piazza in beautiful Cefalu' Sicily. I love Sicily out of all of Italy. Warm people, great food, and more history and beauty. No wonder it's called the pearl of the Mediterranean.
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Château de Falaise is best known as a castle, where William the Conqueror, the son of Duke Robert of Normandy, was born in about 1028. William went on to conquer England and become king and possession of the castle descended through his heirs until the 13th century when it was captured by King Philip II of France. Possession of the castle changed hands several times during the Hundred Years' War. The castle was deserted during the 17th century. Since 1840 it has been protected as a monument historique.

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