Caccamo Castle

Caccamo, Italy

The Castello di Caccamo is among the largest and best preserved Norman castles in Sicily, and one of the largest in Italy. The castle is built on a steep cliff.

The castle as it is today was built by Matthew Bonnellus in the 12th century. It was later modified by the Chiaramontes in the 14th century, and by other rulers until the 17th century.

Caccamo castle is a large structure built of white stone, having an irregular plan. It has walls with V-shaped battlements, towers, a moat and a courtyard. The interior consists of a maze of rooms and stairways.

The most notable room within the castle is the Sala della Congiura, also known as the Conspiracy Hall. In 1160, some Norman barons met in this room to plot against William I of Sicily, but the rebellion failed.

The castle was inhabited by descendants of the Dukes of Caccamo until it was purchased by the Region of Sicily in October 1963. By this time, the castle was in ruins. Restoration work funded by the Region of Sicily began in 1974.

Today, the castle is open to the public. A restaurant called A Castellana is located on the ground level of the castle, while other parts of the structure are also used for conferences and meetings.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Giuseppe Gallo (3 years ago)
It Is very difficult to find a Castel likes that in Sicily
dusty (3 years ago)
excellent castle on the whole for all those in sicily; half of signage is only in italian language; staff only speaks italian; no credit cards are accepted for admission; no food or beverages are present; a passable bathroom is available after paying entry fee.
Michael Nadin (3 years ago)
Dusty and disorganised but worth a visit if you're a castle lover.
Raffaele Santagati (3 years ago)
One of the best conserved castles from the midle ages in Sicily. Stunning views and very fun to see
Mark Daniel (3 years ago)
The cattle has some great things to look at. Although I did think it could be better sign posted so that you can see it all.
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