Enna Cathedral

Enna, Italy

The Duomo (Cathedral) of Enna, a notable example of religious architecture in Sicily, was built in the 14th century by queen Eleonora, Frederick III's wife. It was renovated and remodeled after the fire of 1446. The great Baroque facade, in yellow tufa-stone, is surmounted by a massive campanile with finely shaped decorative elements. The portal on the right side is from the 16th century, while the other is from the original 14th-century edifice. The interior has a nave with two aisles, separated by massive Corinthian columns, and three apses. The stucco decoration is from the 16th and 17th centuries. Art works include a 15th-century crucifix panel painting, a canvas by Guglielmo Borremans, the presbytery paintings by Filippo Paladini (1613), and a Baroque side portal. The cathedral's treasure is housed in the Alessi Museum, and includes precious ornaments, the gold crown with diamonds known as the 'Crown of the Virgin,' Byzantine icons, thousands of ancient coins, and other collections.

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Address

Piazza Duomo 1, Enna, Italy
See all sites in Enna

Details

Founded: 1446
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Harriet Aseru (2 years ago)
Here you feel the presence of God as you enter inside the Cathedral, not to mention the beautiful interior design of the cathedral
Harriet Aseru (2 years ago)
Here you feel the presence of God as you enter inside the Cathedral, not to mention the beautiful interior design of the cathedral
Sławomir Śmiarowski (3 years ago)
Very nice place, worth visit, not to compare with Monreale though
Sławomir Śmiarowski (3 years ago)
Very nice place, worth visit, not to compare with Monreale though
Derma Clinique (3 years ago)
It is a great place where you feel wonderful.
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