Late Baroque Town of Modica

Modica, Italy

Modica is a city and comune of 54.456 inhabitants situated in the Hyblaean Mountains. Rebuilt following the devastating earthquake of 1693, its architecture has been recognised as providing outstanding testimony to the exuberant genius and final flowering of Baroque art in Europe and, along with other towns in the Val di Noto, is part of UNESCO Heritage Sites in Italy.

odica consists of two urban centres, 'Modica Alta' (Upper Modica) and 'Modica Bassa' (Lower Modica). The older upper part is perched on the rocky top of the southern Ibeli hill, the lower part is built on the lower slopes and valley below. The walk down from Modica Alta to Modica Bassa reveals vistas of the lower town and involves many steps; not many attempt the reverse journey on foot.

The large Baroque Cathedral 'San Giorgio' is dedicated to St George. While the cathedral was rebuilt following the earthquake of 1693, like many other parts of the city its roots are in the Middle Ages. From the front of the Cathedral a staircase of 300 steps leads down towards Modica Bassa.

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Modica, Italy
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Founded: 17th century
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Italy

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