Noto Cathedral

Noto, Italy

Noto Cathedral construction, in the style of the Sicilian Baroque, began in the early 18th century and was completed in 1776. It is dedicated to Saint Nicholas of Myra, and has been the cathedral of the Diocese of Noto since the diocese's establishment in 1844.

The cathedral dome collapsed in 1996 as a result of unremedied structural weakening caused by an earthquake in 1990, to which injudicious building alterations in the 1950s may have contributed. It has since been rebuilt, and was reopened in 2007.

The façade, the composition of which is comparable to those of the church of Notre-Dame, Versailles, and the pre-revolutionary church of Saint-Roch in Paris, was started in late 1767 (the nearby campanile bears the date 1768) to designs of about 1740 by Gagliardi.

In the 19th century the dome had to be reconstructed twice, ending up as a Neo-Classical construction, after collapses caused by earthquakes. In the 1950s much refurbishment was carried out, not entirely successfully, for example the trompe-l'oeil of the vertical elements and the tempera decoration of the vaults by the painters Arduino and Baldinelli, as well as major alterations to the high altar and the organ. Most serious however was the replacement of the original pitched roof of the nave by a heavy loft of Roman brick and concrete which was probably one of the causes of the collapse of 1996.

The exterior is of pale yellow limestone, in the Sicilian Baroque style. In front of the cathedral are four statues of saints on pillars. On the left tower is mounted the church bell, and on the right tower a clock. In the central tower, there is a large window. There are also three doors. Over the crossing is the large central dome.

The interior is now simply painted white, as the 18th century interior decoration was destroyed in the collapse. The principal features and furnishings are those consecrated on 13 January 2011, as above.

The cathedral houses the relics of Saint Corrado Confalonieri, patron saint of the city of Noto.

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Details

Founded: 1776
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marko Cvetkovic (8 months ago)
Very big cathedral, very nice from outside. Inside renovated and not much to see but still worth a visit. Entire city of Noto is a jump in the past walking thru the old street that look the same as 500 years ago.
Marko Cvetkovic (8 months ago)
Very big cathedral, very nice from outside. Inside renovated and not much to see but still worth a visit. Entire city of Noto is a jump in the past walking thru the old street that look the same as 500 years ago.
Joshua Formentera (8 months ago)
A beautiful church situated in the city of Noto which is a UNESCO world heritage site in Sicily. The church is a Sicilian baroque in style and has beautiful architecture inside. I love the church and I spent an hour inside by just looking at those beautiful religious artwork. From the outside the church looks architecturally very beautiful. The stairs entrance is quiet dramatic going inside to the church. Beautiful! When visiting the old town of Noto the church a must place to see.
Joshua Formentera (8 months ago)
A beautiful church situated in the city of Noto which is a UNESCO world heritage site in Sicily. The church is a Sicilian baroque in style and has beautiful architecture inside. I love the church and I spent an hour inside by just looking at those beautiful religious artwork. From the outside the church looks architecturally very beautiful. The stairs entrance is quiet dramatic going inside to the church. Beautiful! When visiting the old town of Noto the church a must place to see.
Danielle Tanner (8 months ago)
Beautiful, engaging place
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