Late Baroque Town of Scicli

Scicli, Italy

Scicli was founded by the Sicels (whence probably the name) around 300 BCE. In 864 CE, Scicli was conquered by the Arabs, as part of the Muslim conquest of Sicily. Under their rule it flourished as an agricultural and trade center.

In 1091, it was conquered from the Arabs by the Normans, under Roger I of Hauteville, after a fierce battle. Following the various dynasties ruling the Kingdom of Sicily, it was an Aragonese-Spanish possession before being united in the Kingdom of Italy in the mid 19th century.

Following a catastrophic earthquake in 1693, much of the town was rebuilt in the Sicilian baroque style, which today gives the town the elegant appearance which draws many tourists to visit it. Alongside seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it has been listed as one of UNESCO's World Heritage Site in the list of Late Baroque Towns of the Val di Noto.

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Founded: 17th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

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