Staircase of Santa Maria del Monte

Caltagirone, Italy

Scalinata di Santa Maria del Monte is a set of world-famous steps in Caltagirone. It was built in 1606 in order to connect the ancient part of Caltagirone to the new city built in the upper part. The staircase, over 130 meters long, is flanked by balcony buildings and is today one of the identifying monuments of the city.

In 1844, the staircase underwent modifications, among which the elimination of rest areas stands out, which results in a lower inclination.

Since 1954, the steps of Santa Maria del Monte have been entirely decorated with polychrome ceramic tiles, following the ancient local artisan tradition.

The figurative themes of the ceramics are floral or geometric, and represent the Arab, Norman, Angevin-Aragonese, Spanish, Renaissance, Baroque, eighteenth-century, nineteenth-century and contemporary styles.

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Details

Founded: 1606
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nitura Alin (2 years ago)
Beautiful place!
Nitura Alin (2 years ago)
Beautiful place!
Abigail Eaton Richards (2 years ago)
Nice views. Great for photos
Justin Vassallo (2 years ago)
Really long and impressive but overshadowed by the poor state of the area
Justin Vassallo (2 years ago)
Really long and impressive but overshadowed by the poor state of the area
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