Staircase of Santa Maria del Monte

Caltagirone, Italy

Scalinata di Santa Maria del Monte is a set of world-famous steps in Caltagirone. It was built in 1606 in order to connect the ancient part of Caltagirone to the new city built in the upper part. The staircase, over 130 meters long, is flanked by balcony buildings and is today one of the identifying monuments of the city.

In 1844, the staircase underwent modifications, among which the elimination of rest areas stands out, which results in a lower inclination.

Since 1954, the steps of Santa Maria del Monte have been entirely decorated with polychrome ceramic tiles, following the ancient local artisan tradition.

The figurative themes of the ceramics are floral or geometric, and represent the Arab, Norman, Angevin-Aragonese, Spanish, Renaissance, Baroque, eighteenth-century, nineteenth-century and contemporary styles.

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Details

Founded: 1606
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Mark Vassallo (2 months ago)
Open area public stairs that take one down from the old town to the new town and was built after the great earthquake of 1692. 142 steps with 142 different ceramic hand painted tiles creating a museum of ceramic art in its own right. More often than not during the fairer part of the year the steps are adorned with flowers depicting dates or images. During the 14th & 15th August each year the stairs are decorated with lanterns powered by olive oil, a feat that involves a couple of hundred volunteers.
Max Thrane (2 months ago)
Nice attraction that will require more than the usual amount of time and effort to see it from all angles. Worth it! ?
Nitura Alin (2 years ago)
Beautiful place!
Nitura Alin (2 years ago)
Beautiful place!
Abigail Eaton Richards (2 years ago)
Nice views. Great for photos
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