Vassallaggi is a Sicilian prehistoric Bronze Age archaeological site which had a later flourishing after the 7th century BC as a phrourion (fortress). The site is located in the middle of the Salso river valley, at 704 m above sea level, in a strategic location for communication between the southern coast of Sicily and the northern part of the island.

The site first developed in the Bronze Age (18th-14th centuries BC), from which time some cave tombs of the Castelluccio culture survive and a circular hut with furniture. The most ancient inhabitants of Vassallaggi were presumably the Sicans.

No finds have come to light from the middle and late Bronze Age, so these hills may have been abandoned at that time; this might be a result of emigration towards the coast from the middle Bronze Age and then as a result of the preference for more defensible sites in face of the arrival of the Sicels (which might have taken the form of an invasion). Thus the site was unoccupied for about 700 years, before a Sican settlement developed here in the 8th century BC.

This new habitation during the Iron Age continued until Greek occupation of the site in the 5th century, when the village seems to have been fortified and to have developed within the sphere of Akragas.

After the foundation of that city by Gela (most powerful of the Dorian colonies founded in the 7th century BC), a period of expansion of Greek origin people began which led to the colonisation of central Sicily, using the natural route along the Himera river valley (the modern Salso). The expansion into inland Sicily may be explained by the demographic pressure on the Greek communities of the motherland and the other Greek colonies. The need to augment agricultural production and open new markets for manufactured goods may also have been a causal factor.

The site of Vassallaggi, however, based on archaeological evidence, was only conquered and colonised by Greeks from Akragas in the 6th century BC, unlike nearby sites, like Sabucina, Capodarso and Gibil Gabib which were colonised by Gela, as shown by the proto-Corinthian style pottery found there, which is never found at Vassallaggi.

The most important discoveries in the rich necropolis, both in terms of quantity and quality of items recovered, derive from this period. They include ceramic sarcophagi, one of which is perfectly preserved, locally-made vases, pottery from other Greek areas, bronze knives, spears and strigils, as well as coins. A temple for the worship of a female deity was built at this time.

The absence of concrete evidence makes it difficult to attribute any known ancient place name to the location. It has been suggested that the site is Motyon, the first fortified centre in the Acragantine area. The city was inexplicably abandoned around 320 BC. There are no traces of objects after this date.

From the Roman period, traces of small nucleated settlements are found in the valley and the surrounding territory, including especially important routes to Akragas. Christian tombs, dating to the 5th century AD have been found, near the prehistoric caves.

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San Cataldo, Italy
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Founded: 1700-1300 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alfonso Gianluca Gucciardo (Performing Arts MD) (4 months ago)
Five stars to the site. Very beautifull. A star in its current state.
Beniamino Caramanna (9 months ago)
Left to himself. Carelessness from p. TO
Gaetano Violo (14 months ago)
Archaeological site abandoned by everything and everyone, too bad because a beautiful piece of history is burned, it would be a place that would attract a lot of tourism but the indifference and the unwillingness to make tourism grow in these areas and on the agenda, so to speak to say that there is something else in between.
The Liar (21 months ago)
Crying because it was the green cradle of my childhood and the same for the state of abandonment, a wonderful place where you can carefully take great walks in the coolness of the Sicilian mountains 780m s.l.m
Andrea Bardi (2 years ago)
Beautiful location, interesting site but very usability and explanations
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