Falkland Palace is a royal palace of the Scottish Kings. Before Falkland Palace was built a hunting lodge existed on the site in the 12th century. This lodge was expanded in the 13th century and became a castle which was owned by the Earls of Fife, the famous Clan MacDuff.

Between 1501 and 1541 Kings James IV and James V transformed the old castle into a beautiful renaissance royal palace. Falkland was included in the 'morning gift' that James VI gave to his bride Anne of Denmark.

For five hours in the morning of 28 June 1592 Francis Stewart, Earl of Bothwell and his men attempted to capture the palace and James VI and Anne of Denmark. They attempted to batter down the back gate but were repulsed by gunshots. The king withdrew to the gatehouse tower and his guard shot at Bothwell's men. Bothwell abandoned the attack at 7 o'clock in the morning, and rode away with the king's horses.

After the Union of the Crowns in 1603, the architect James Murray repaired the palace for the visit of King James in 1617. In 1887 John, 3rd Marquis of Bute purchased the estates of Falkland and started a 20-year restoration of the palace. At the time the Palace was a ruin with no windows or doors. Thanks to his restoration work and considerable budget the Palace remains standing today.

Today there is much to explore as you walk through the palace, taking in the detailed panelling in the drawing room, the stunning Chapel Royal (where mass is still said every Sunday morning) and the fascinating painted walls of the library, as well as the re-created royal apartments.

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Founded: 1501-1541
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Esther Jacobs (2 months ago)
Our group absolutely loved it. The girls had so much fun looking for the lego figures in the rooms. Each area of the Palace is truly stunning, with original features and furniture. The hosts in each room are incredible, with a vast knowledge of the Palace and it's rich history. We all had a great time playing with the garden toys!
Karen Billimore (3 months ago)
Beautiful formal gardens and wilder orchard area. Very peaceful and relaxing. Lots of butterflies and bees. Friendly and informative staff. Especially the volunteer (sorry didn't catch his name) with his beautiful pet Harris hawk - Maebh. Also here is the oldest tennis court in the world which is still played on. Lots of history. Didn't make it into the palace itself - save that for another day.
Travel Malarkey (4 months ago)
We really loved our visit here. The village is cosy and beautiful and the Palace was really interesting with excellent information given by the hosts in the main rooms of interest. We liked it so much that we went back a couple of weeks later to see A Midsummer Night's Dream performed in the gardens. All tucked away in my mind's happy memories box now. ?
Alex56 (4 months ago)
Allow yourself time for this attraction, the Village, Palace & apothecary gardens combined make for a interesting place to visit. The village people are friendly, there's nice tearooms & shop's around the Palace. The Palace staff & guides are very knowledgeable & helpful. I've drove passed by the Palace a few times but never new the extent of the Palace, grounds & gardens etc. In my opinion a good place for a few hours visit on a nice sunny day. Always check opening hours before your visit.
Craig Aitken (5 months ago)
A lovely Royal Palace which has been really well preserved and restored. The gardens are also worth a visit. All the staff were very knowledgeable, helpful and friendly.
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