Culross Palace is a late 16th - early 17th century merchant's house in Culross. The palace, or 'Great Lodging', was constructed between 1597 and 1611 by Sir George Bruce, the Laird of Carnock. Bruce was a successful merchant who had a flourishing trade with other Forth ports, the Low Countries and Sweden. He had interests in coal mining, salt production, and shipping, and is credited with sinking the world's first coal mine to extend under the sea.

Many of the materials used in the construction of the palace were obtained during the course of Bruce's foreign trade. Baltic pine, red pantiles, and Dutch floor tiles and glass were all used. The exterior boasts the use of crow-stepped gables, including a statue of a veiled woman posing on the gable step. The palace features fine interiors, with decorative mural and ceiling painting, 17th and 18th century furniture and a fine collection of Staffordshire and Scottish pottery.

Although never a royal residence, James VI visited the Palace in 1617. The palace is now in the care of the National Trust for Scotland who have restored a model seventeenth-century garden, complete with raised beds, a covered walkway and crushed shell paths. The herbs, vegetables and fruit trees planted in the garden are types that were used in the early seventeenth century.

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Founded: 1597-1611
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

User Reviews

Simona Tucker (11 months ago)
We could not get in the Palace due to covid, but we had a walk around the town and WHAT A PLACE If you are fan of Outlander you will love it, if you are not, you still gonna love it. Little and narrow streets together with old buildings, feels like transported to the past. Don't forget to visit Abbey and the kirk.
Jax Thomas (2 years ago)
Lovely little village with sea views. Lots of history and beautiful architecture
Simona Tucker (2 years ago)
We could not get in the Palace dues to covid, but we had a walk around the town and WHAT A PLACE If you are fan of Outlander you will love it, if you are not, you still gonna love it. Little and narrow streets together with old buildings, feels like transported to the past. Don't for get to visit Abbey and the kirk.
Piotr Cybula (Jeżozwierz) (2 years ago)
Fantastic place with beautiful old houses. Palace and gardens could be maintained a little bit better, but the covid-19 takes all.
Piotr Cybula (Jeżozwierz) (2 years ago)
Fantastic place with beautiful old houses. Palace and gardens could be maintained a little bit better, but the covid-19 takes all.
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