MacDuff's Cross is the remains of an ancient white sandstone monument, located on a historic site between Lindores and Newburgh. Robert Sibbald suggested the date of its construction to have been 1059 CE, however earlier dates have been considered.

The cross is supposed to mark the spot where the clan Macduff, in return for its chief's services against Macbeth, was granted rights of sanctuary and composition for murder done in hot blood. This legend suggests a penalty of nine cows and a heifer for such a crime. Shortly after the death of Macbeth, King of Scotland, Malcolm III of Scotland was also supposed to have bestowed on the Thane of Fife the privilege of ordaining the King, and leading the charge in battle. The cross was originally dedicated to Saint Magider and smashed to pieces by a mob of fanatical followers of John Knox in 1559.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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Scott Baird (2 years ago)
Gillian Hogarth (2 years ago)
Trudy Gourlay (3 years ago)
Crash MacDuff【ツ】 (3 years ago)
A place of Clan reverence. MacDuff's Cross, also known as the Cross of MacDuff or Ninewells. The remains of an ancient white sandstone monument. The date of its construction might be around 1059 CE, however earlier dates have been considered. The cross is supposed to mark the spot where the clan Macduff, in return for its chief's services against Macbeth, was granted rights of sanctuary and composition for murder done in hot blood. This legend suggests a penalty of nine cows and a heifer for such a crime. Shortly after the death of Macbeth, King of Scotland, Malcolm III of Scotland was also supposed to have bestowed on the Thane of Fife the privilege of ordaining the King, and leading the charge in battle. The cross was originally dedicated to Saint Magider and smashed to pieces by a mob of fanatical followers of John Knox in 1559. It was a place where William Ballingall suggested "arch-criminals claimed the protection of the Law of Clan Macduff". MacDuff's cross was marked with a "metrical inscription, in a strange half-Latin jargon, the varying copies of which are still preserved. It read: "An altar for those whom law pursues, a hall for those whom strife pursues, being without a home. Who makest thy way hither, to thee this paction becomes a harbour. But there is hope of peace only when the murder has been committed by those born of my grandson. I set free the accused, a fine of a thousand drachms from his lands. On account of Macgridin and of this offering, take once for all the cleansing of my heirs beneath this stone filled with water."
Sailing Yacht Salacia (5 years ago)
Steeped in Scottish historical significance, this Earl of Fife monument is set within stunning scenery and a local farm. Feel more could be done with public information and directions.
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