Finlarig Castle is an early 17th-century castle standing on a mound on a peninsula between the River Lochay and Loch Tay. Built in 1629 by 'Black' Duncan Campbell (Donnchadh Dubh) of Glenorchy, the castle is an L-plan tower-house, formerly protected by an outer enclosure or barmekin, which is now in a dangerously ruinous condition. It was one of many strongholds built in Argyll and Perthshire by the Campbells of Breadalbane. The castle was visited by Rob Roy MacGregor in 1713.

Near the Castle's north wall is a stone-lined pit which, legend has it, was used for beheading prisoners of noble blood. Commoners were hanged on a nearby oak tree. Near the Castle are the remnants of the Breadalbane Mausoleum, a mock-Tudor chapel erected in 1829 on the site of an earlier chapel and burial place founded in 1523 by an ancestor of the Earls of Breadalbane, Sir Colin Campbell. Allowed to decay over many years, this brick-built building has almost completely collapsed.

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Founded: 1629
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Liz Stevens (13 months ago)
Atmospheric
Tracey McDonald (13 months ago)
The access to the ruins is not easily identifiable. The ruins are behind a crop of trees on private land. There is not a huge amount of castle left but it is worth a quick visit and the walk to it is quite nice. You can tell someone at some point has tried to repair parts as there is a fair amount of concrete around but it is a lovely, peaceful location to visit on a nice day.
dzdzownicolo (14 months ago)
Ruins of Finlarig Castle. If you like old castles then this is a place to go. It's on a private land but you can access it for free. It might not be safe to go inside due to state of it.
Scotty D (14 months ago)
Not far along the road from Falls of Dochart to here, its a nice ruin, quiet (unless someone is up there with drones
Kym Bongartz (14 months ago)
This was a lovely wee find. My son loved exploring it. Was great to walk around and see what's left of it.
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