The National Wallace Monument is which commemorates Sir William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero. The tower was constructed following a fundraising campaign, which accompanied a resurgence of Scottish national identity in the 19th century. Completed in 1869 to the designs of architect John Thomas Rochead at a cost of £18,000, the monument is a 67-metre sandstone tower, built in the Victorian Gothic style.

The tower stands on the Abbey Craig, a volcanic crag above Cambuskenneth Abbey, from which Wallace was said to have watched the gathering of the army of King Edward I of England, just before the Battle of Stirling Bridge. The monument is open to the general public. Visitors climb the 246 step spiral staircase to the viewing gallery inside the monument's crown, which provides expansive views of the Ochil Hills and the Forth Valley.

A number of artifacts believed to have belonged to Wallace are on display inside the monument, including the Wallace Sword, a 1.63-metre long sword weighing almost three kilograms. Inside is also a Hall of Heroes, a series of busts of famous Scots, effectively a small national Hall of Fame.

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Founded: 1869
Category: Statues in United Kingdom

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sean Lennon (3 years ago)
Enjoyed the walk up to monument, quite steep in places, but the views from the top are excellent. You can normally go inside and climb a spiral staircase to the top but it was closed the day I visited. There were little wooden surprises along the route. Nice coffee shop at the bottom.
david miller (3 years ago)
The Wallace Monument on the outskirts of Stirling is another place of Scottish historical importance. It was built to commemorate Sir William Wallace. He was a Scottish Knight who was one of the main leaders during the first war of Scottish independence, and helped win the battle of Stirling against the English. Wallace was later hanged, drawn and quartered after his capture by the English, and became a Scottish hero known far beyond his own homeland. The trail leading to the tower is well kept and makes for an enjoyable hike. The views from the hilltop scenic and very beautiful.
Charlie April (3 years ago)
Pick a sunny day to go, and you will not regret the view. Entry is about £11 per person, but worth the admission, for the view alone. They will be doing some refurbishments till mid 2019, so check before going making sure they are open. There is also a lovely walk around the momument it self where we spotted a wild dear running around, quite cool! oh... 276 steps, no lifts... just saying ;)
Amy Stein (3 years ago)
The views are incredible and worth every step to get to the top. The sculptures along the trail are fascinating. Cafe is very nice. The staff could not be friendlier or more helpful. The Monument will be close on 11 February 2019 for approximately two months for renovations. There are just over 200 steps to the top of the monument!
Simon Carter (3 years ago)
Having visited Stirling Castle, we wanted to see The Wallace Monument too, it being fairly handy while in the area. The car park was easy to find and we'll set out. The visitor centre is well stocked with gifts and the ticket-buying was as easy as it normally is. We chose to walk up the hill but you can easily go up in a minibus if you prefer. The bonus of walking is that there are sculptures and information boards on the way up and, if you take it steady, it's probably going to do you a lot of good!!! The staff were really helpful and just friendly. The stairs up the tower are narrow and it isn't that easy for people going up and coming down to pass each other. Any student of our island and individual, national histories is going to find this place and it's history really interesting, as we did. Once you get above the first level, there are less people and on a blustery day the top was, ummm, invigorating to say the least!!! Worth going if you're in the area. We enjoyed our visit. Not all of our party got to the top but it was worthwhile, nevertheless. Handy to get to as the roads are so good, locally. Thanks to everyone on the staff!!!
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