Argyll's Lodging is a 17th-century town-house in the Renaissance style, situated below Stirling Castle. It was a residence of the Earl of Stirling and later the Earls of Argyll.

Built and decorated in Renaissance style, the original plan of the house was shaped like a P, with the upper part centered around three wings around a courtyard. During the early 19th century, the house was purchased by the British Army, which then transformed the grand building into a military hospital. The house retained this military function for well over a century until it was eventually turned into a youth hostel in 1964. Three decades later, the National Trust of Scotland turned Argyll’s Lodging into a museum. Highlights of the mansion include the High Dining Room’s impressive painted decorations and the Drawing room’s grand fireplace and recreated tapestries.

An interpretative tour of the lodging is available on the ground level as well as a display about the inhabitants of the lodging. Visitors using wheelchairs will need assistance to negotiate narrow passages and doorways.

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    Founded: 17th century
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    User Reviews

    mark “Markymark” turner (16 months ago)
    Shame its currently closed
    mark “Markymark” turner (16 months ago)
    Shame its currently closed
    Helen Skinner (Dr Cooper) (4 years ago)
    Had a lovely tour guide explain the house and it's history. It has some great features and the restorations are amazing. Not sure it would have been as good without the enthusiasm of our guide, she was very knowledgeable and really interested in history. I can imagine that we might have been underwhelmed if we just wandered about so I highly recommend taking one of the free tours.
    Helen Skinner (Dr Cooper) (4 years ago)
    Had a lovely tour guide explain the house and it's history. It has some great features and the restorations are amazing. Not sure it would have been as good without the enthusiasm of our guide, she was very knowledgeable and really interested in history. I can imagine that we might have been underwhelmed if we just wandered about so I highly recommend taking one of the free tours.
    Kenyon Born (4 years ago)
    I was pretty underwhelmed. There is nothing very unique to see. Admission is included with your ticket to Stirling Castle and it's a good thing because I can't imagine there being any other reason people would visit. I would not go back simply because there is nothing interesting to see. The staff were very nice though and even pointed out the beaver above the front door after I told them I am Canadian.
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