Gliwice Castle

Gliwice, Poland

The so-called Piasts' Castle in Gliwice dates back to the mid-14th century. It consists of a tower from 1322, which was originally part of the city walls, and an adjoining building which was probably an armory. Modifications were carried out in the 15th century, between 1558-61 it became the residence of Friedrich von Zettritz. Later it was an armory, a jail, a magazine and since 1945 a museum. Between 1956-59 it was thoroughly rebuilt and partially reconstructed. Since that time it is claimed to be a Piast castle, although no sourced evidence backs this claim. Since 1959 the castle has been part of the Gliwice Museum.

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Address

Pod Murami 2, Gliwice, Poland
See all sites in Gliwice

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marianna Delka (5 months ago)
The castle itself did not make a great impression on us, but we appreciate the Museum within its walls.
Renata Anna (6 months ago)
The castle looks very nice from the outside, it is surrounded by a mini park, there are benches, a statue of Batory. Why him, and not, for example, Casimir the Great, under whose rule the castle was built, or of Prince Siemowit, who had it built, I have not guessed. The museum inside is small, but the exhibits are interesting and you can see in many places that attempts were made to introduce some modern forms of presenting the collections into the castle walls (a large tombstone or a reconstruction of a burial in the floor under tempered glass attracts attention). Children, of course, are most interested in the mammoth. And here a little "but" - we didn't manage to see the woolly rhinoceros, I don't know if it was due to covid or renovation, but this room was closed. Unfortunately, there is no information on the website on this subject ... Similarly with samurai weapons - we have not seen and there is no information about excluding some of the collections from visiting.
George Trofymov (3 years ago)
Absolutely lovely place. Excursion isn't long (so you are not tired, but maybe not that full of information and impressions s you would like to be) but interesting. And nice museum of trains around. I would say this place is excellent example of polish museum system. If you are curious and like that topic of labor, underground and machinery - this is a place to visit!
Lukas Be (4 years ago)
One usually holds some kind of expectations from a visit in municipal, historically oriented, museum. Well, If you'd like to learn something about history and legacy of Gliwice; one of the oldest persisting settlement on this land, you should rather explore Wikipedia. First of all, the display items are very poor and lack any proper description. Most of the exhibits are or fake (e.g. poor copy of sarcophagus which tries to mimic the original presented in Wroclaw's National Museum) or displayed without any proper context (e.g. Mammoth's remains retrieved from old German Silesian Museum of Natural History). There are some interesting pieces there, like artefacts left by Lusatian culture, but staff working there have little to no guidance or understanding required to answer historical questions at all. In general, it is affordable and can be mildly interesting but do not expect much.
Patrykshibo 1 (6 years ago)
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Beckov Castle

The Beckov castle stands on a steep 50 m tall rock in the village Beckov. The dominance of the rock and impression of invincibility it gaves, challenged our ancestors to make use of these assets. The result is a remarkable harmony between the natural setting and architecture.

The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

The next owners, the Bánffys who adapted the Gothic castle to the Renaissance residence, improved its fortifications preventing the Turks from conquering it at the end of the 16th century. When Bánffys died out, the castle was owned by several noble families. It fell in decay after fire in 1729.

The history of the castle is the subject of different legends. One of them narrates the origin of the name of castle derived from that of jester Becko for whom the Duke Stibor had the castle built.

Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

The well-conserved ruins of the castle, now the National Cultural Monument, are frequently visited by tourists, above all in July when the castle festival takes place. The former Ambro curia situated below the castle now shelters the exhibition of the local history.