Gliwice Castle

Gliwice, Poland

The so-called Piasts' Castle in Gliwice dates back to the mid-14th century. It consists of a tower from 1322, which was originally part of the city walls, and an adjoining building which was probably an armory. Modifications were carried out in the 15th century, between 1558-61 it became the residence of Friedrich von Zettritz. Later it was an armory, a jail, a magazine and since 1945 a museum. Between 1956-59 it was thoroughly rebuilt and partially reconstructed. Since that time it is claimed to be a Piast castle, although no sourced evidence backs this claim. Since 1959 the castle has been part of the Gliwice Museum.

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Address

Pod Murami 2, Gliwice, Poland
See all sites in Gliwice

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Grzegorz “Roody” Witek (5 months ago)
The castle looks inconspicuous from the outside, but the exhibition inside is very interesting. Lots of exhibits showing life in Silesia throughout history. You can spend a whole day or an hour or two, depending on how much you want to immerse yourself in history.
Agnieszka Maj (5 months ago)
Byłam w sobotę, zachwyciły mnie wnętrza zwłaszcza sufity! Fantastyczne miejsce - można zobaczyć piękne rzeczy. NAPRAWDĘ WARTO! ?
Piotr Barnert (6 months ago)
Despite the small size of the castle, the exhibition is interesting; ladies willing to help
Marianna Delka (2 years ago)
The castle itself did not make a great impression on us, but we appreciate the Museum within its walls.
Renata Anna (2 years ago)
The castle looks very nice from the outside, it is surrounded by a mini park, there are benches, a statue of Batory. Why him, and not, for example, Casimir the Great, under whose rule the castle was built, or of Prince Siemowit, who had it built, I have not guessed. The museum inside is small, but the exhibits are interesting and you can see in many places that attempts were made to introduce some modern forms of presenting the collections into the castle walls (a large tombstone or a reconstruction of a burial in the floor under tempered glass attracts attention). Children, of course, are most interested in the mammoth. And here a little "but" - we didn't manage to see the woolly rhinoceros, I don't know if it was due to covid or renovation, but this room was closed. Unfortunately, there is no information on the website on this subject ... Similarly with samurai weapons - we have not seen and there is no information about excluding some of the collections from visiting.
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