Old Church of Saint Bartholomew

Gliwice, Poland

The Old church of Saint Bartholomew is a fortified church in Gliwice. Originally, it was built in Romanesque style about 1232 and situated far outside the defensive walls of the city.

In the 15th century, it was enlarged in Gothic style. The western tower was enhanced using brick. Its character is rather military, than that of a steeple.

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Address

Toszecka 38, Gliwice, Poland
See all sites in Gliwice

Details

Founded: 1232
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mariola Świetlicka (46 days ago)
A wonderful church, my childhood and youth were a parishioner there.
Anna Wilczek (2 months ago)
If you're into architecture it's a must see.
Tomek Pryesr (2 months ago)
Priests do not care about the historic altar or the pews that are already badly damaged. Everything is being fixed temporarily as long as it is being fixed.
Marian Blachuta (3 months ago)
Large bright church. Ample parking. Good organs. Proper organization in the era of the coronavirus epidemic: disinfectant liquid at the entrance, good organization of communion - separately in the mouth, separately in the hand.
John James Rambo (3 years ago)
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