Arnot Tower is a ruined 16th-century castle. The current building dates from c. 1507, though fortifications were present c. 1400. The castle has four storeys and a vaulted basement. It was built by the Arnot family who have records dating back to 1105. David Arnot of Fyfe was one of 2000 noble landowners required to swear allegiance to King Edward I of England in 1296. Nicol Arnot Arnot was a loyal supporter of King Robert the Bruce. Robert Arnot was killed in the battle of Flodden in 1514. The Arnots abandoned the old tower around 1700.

In 1760 local poet Michael Bruce wrote a poem about the true story of a love affair between an Arnot daughter and a Balfour of nearby Burleigh Castle. The families were in a feud, and it is believed the daughter of Arnot eloped to Burleigh Castle.

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Founded: c. 1507
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Dean Mckenzie (17 months ago)
Really nice good wedding venue
Jax Frost (17 months ago)
Small tower. Drove past it initially. Seems to be located either in or right beside someone's garden.
Rhyan Fraser (3 years ago)
Great l know the woman who ones it
June Ball (4 years ago)
Amazing bit of history still standing
kevin queen (5 years ago)
Still waiting on an invite
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